Concurrent Sessions

Our presenters from across the university will lead 30-minute or 1-hour breakout sessions focused on sharing Cornerstone Teaching Strategies, Instructional Technology and Tools, and/or Assessment Practices. Sessions will begin at 11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.

Look for these symbols to follow one of three tracks:

    Cornerstone Teaching Strategies
    Instructional Technology and Tools
    Assessment Practices

Morning Concurrent Sessions: 11 a.m. - 12 p.m.

1) Cornerstones of Active Learning in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Teaching

(Room 201)

Presenters: Joe Steffen, Professor, Department of Biology, College of Arts and Sciences; and Mark Running, Assistant Professor, Department of Biology, College of Arts and Sciences

How can you transform your teacher-centered, lecture-style science, technology, engineering, or mathematics (STEM) course into a student-centered course where students willingly and actively participate thus enhancing their learning? In this session, the presenters will share their insights and experiences implementing active learning tools and techniques, and offer a set of best practice recommendations for how you can begin using this approach, or expand the active learning toolkit you are already using.

2) Two-For-one! This session offers two 30-minute presentations.
Part One: Promoting Student Engagement with Social Media

(Room 14)

Presenter: Pradip Patel, Professor, Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine

In this interactive session, gather examples of how social media is being used in higher education and consider how you might use different social media platforms to promote student engagement and learning. Using your own professional teaching goals as a guide, you will have the opportunity to formulate a plan for next steps. The presenter will also describe guidelines for online professionalism and give tips for how you can apply them to your own teaching context.


Part Two: Blackboard Collaborate and the New Online Classroom M.E.C.C.A.
(Room 14)

Presenter: Mike Homan, Blackboard Technology Specialist, Delphi Center for Teaching and Learning

Join us on our adventure of exploring Collaborate, a free and on demand virtual conferencing solution available to you through Blackboard. This tool and the M.E.C.C.A. model will help you Mediate office hours, Educate within the classroom, Cultivate group study, Collaborate with your students and colleagues, and Appreciate the benefits of using Collaborate to enrich the online learning environment.

3) Two-For-one! This session offers two 30-minute presentations.
Part One: Assessing Prior Knowledge and Addressing Student Misconceptions: Helping Students Know What They Don't Know (But Think They Do)

(Room 15)

Presenter: Edna Ross, i2a Specialist for Critical Thinking, Delphi Center for Teaching and Learning

Students often assert knowledge and mastery of course content right up until they receive a sometimes dismal grade on a course exam or quiz. How can we counteract the student misconceptions and false mental models that interfere with an accurate, in-depth understanding and mastery? This session will illustrate how iClickers, a classroom response system, can be used to dispel the “fluency illusion” that lulls students into a false sense of competency.


Part Two: Classroom Assessment Techniques as Building Blocks for Powerful Learning
(Room 15)

Presenter: Nisha Gupta, i2a Specialist for Culminating Experiences, Delphi Center for Teaching and Learning

Join us as we learn and practice “Classroom Assessment Techniques,” commonly referred to as “CATS.” CATs are simple, short and effective strategies for engaging with students and gathering real-time data about their learning. As forms of formative learning assessment, these techniques build powerful learning experiences within the classroom. And, they can generally liven up your teaching! Participants will leave with CATs that they can use in their next class meeting.

4) Increasing Class Interaction Through Student Interaction: Collaborative Learning Techniques

(Room 136A)

Presenters: Jeff Hieb, Associate Professor, Department of Engineering Fundamentals, J.B. Speed School of Engineering; and Patricia Ralston, Professor and Chair, Department of Engineering Fundamentals, J.B. Speed School of Engineering

Have you ever wished your students would engage differently with the material during class? Collaborative learning (CL) is a term used to describe a variety of instructional strategies and techniques designed to support student-to-student learning. Session presenters will share their motivation for experimenting with collaborative learning, describe how they used it in a variety of classroom settings, and discuss the role of technology and collegial faculty-to-faculty sharing in supporting their efforts. The presenters will also share recommendations for how you can get started using collaborative learning in your own teaching.

5) Staying on TARGET: Evidence-Based Strategies to Support Adaptive Motivation

(Room 136B)

Presenter: Kate Snyder, Assistant Professor, Department of Educational Psychology, Counseling, and College Student Personnel, College of Education and Human Development

Many instructors characterize their students as either "motivated" or "unmotivated," but did you know that students can be highly motivated in ways that undermine their own learning? In this session, the presenter will describe the difference between adaptive and maladaptive motivational beliefs and behaviors. Using the TARGET framework as a guide, the presenter will share evidence-based strategies to support adaptive motivation. The presenter will also describe how she has infused her own motivation research into her classroom teaching to deepen student learning and engagement.

6) Special Invitation-Only Session for Department Chairs (Room 211)

This session is by invitation only.

7) Hands-On Technology Lab

(Room 6)

This casual and fun interactive session is designed to give you a hands-on opportunity to “test drive” a range of instructional hardware and software. Try out an iPad, check out some new learning apps for your smartphone, or fiddle with an iClicker and practice setting up the system. Experience “backchanneling” by tweeting on Twitter and get answers to your questions about SoftChalk, Blackboard Collaborate, GradeCenter, and Respondus. Your choice! Even “lurking” is learning in the technology lab!

Afternoon Concurrent Sessions: 1:30–2:30 p.m.

1) Two-For-one! This session offers two 30-minute presentations.

Part One: Trials and Tribulations with Softchalk
(Room 201)

Presenter: Steve Ellis, Professor, Department of Biochemistry, and Assistant Dean for Basic Science Education, School of Medicine

SoftChalk is an instructional tool that allows you to create custom lessons by combining your own materials with interactive learning content. It offers the capability of creating quizzes, thus providing rapid course assessment and feedback for learners. In this session, Dr. Steve Ellis will share his experience in developing SoftChalk lessons, including discussing the benefits and pitfalls involved in using this technology as a pedagogical tool. He will share practical tips on how to use the application for building course content and creating an interactive e-learning environment for students.


Part Two: Creating Online Modules with Camtasia
(Room 201)

Presenter: Cynthia Miller, Assistant Professor, Department of Physiology, School of Medicine

This session examines the use of online modules to analyze student preparedness, save valuable class time, improve student performance, and engage millennial learners. The presenter will show how screen-recording software programs, such as Camtasia, can be used to create and edit flash videos from PowerPoint presentations, webcams or pre-recorded clinical videos. Attendees will be invited to brainstorm potential topics for online modules, discuss possible pitfalls, and create a plan for implementing them into their courses.

2) Getting on the Competency-Based Education Bandwagon: Strategies for Developing an Online Learning Program

(Room 14)

Presenters: Aimee Greene, Assistant Director for Instructional Design and Technology, Delphi Center for Teaching and Learning; Ann Herd, Assistant Professor, Organizational Leadership and Learning Program, College of Education and Human Development; Jeffrey Sun, Department of Leadership, Foundations and Human Resource Education, College of Education and Human Development

Competency-based education is an approach to learning and assessment that is emerging in new and existing programs across the nation. A competency-based education (CBE) program is an online program where degrees are awarded based on demonstration of competencies rather than "seat time" in classes. Students progress through a series of competency modules at their own pace, potentially completing a degree at a faster rate than in traditional programs. This session explores the philosophy and unique advantages and challenges of developing a competency-based curriculum. The Organizational Leadership and Learning program's development of a CBE program in healthcare leadership will be used as a case example.

3) Triple Play! This session addresses all three conference tracks! Going Beyond SEE-Is: Connecting with Concept Mapping

(Room 15)

Presenter: Pete Walton, Associate Dean for Undergraduate Affairs and Special Projects, School of Public Health and Information Sciences

Concept mapping is an excellent way to move beyond the popular i2a-inspired SEE-I method to help learners more fully grasp the interrelationships among individual concepts. This session presents the essentials of concept mapping, some of its potential uses, and demonstrates setting up and using IHMC Cmap Tools, a free and easy-to-use software program. In addition, the presenter will demonstrate an Excel-based technique for evaluating learner-submitted Cmap assignments.

4) Providing Meaningful Written Feedback to Promote Revision

(136A)

Presenters: Adam Robinson, Associate Director, Writing Center, Department of English, College of Arts and Sciences; Stephanie Weaver, Graduate Teaching Assistant, Department of English, College of Arts and Sciences

This session will address best practices for providing meaningful, written feedback that can promote revision. Specifically, the presenters will share new ways you can approach reading your students’ written work. They will discuss the types of comments and commenting approaches that may or may not be helpful to students as they revise. The presenters will also invite participants to review a set of “real life” comments and explore the impact—both positive and negative—on helping students improve their writing.

5) Structuring Measurable Student Learning Outcomes with Bloom’s Taxonomy

(Room 136B)

Presenter: Katie Partin, Assistant Director, Department of Institutional Research, Office of Academic Planning and Accountability

At the end of your class, what do you want your students to be able to? What knowledge, skill or ability would the “model student” be able to demonstrate? Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) are goals that describe how a student will be different because of specific learning experiences—and much of that difference relates to how students will think. Bloom’s Taxonomy is a helpful and widely-used resource when writing SLOs related to cognitive skills (knowledge). This session will introduce you to Bloom’s Taxonomy, provide an opportunity to explore its cognitive levels, and help you think more deeply about how you measure your students’ learning.

6) Promoting Learning through Talk in the University Classroom

(Room 211)

Presenter: Penny Howell, Assistant Professor, Department of Literacy and Middle Grades Teacher Education, College of Education and Human Development

This session will focus on the use of student talk in the university classroom to promote learning, critical thinking, and a positive classroom climate. Lauren Resnick (1995) first introduced the concept of “accountable talk” as a means of raising the quality of academic discourse among students. The model provides structure and standards to classroom conversations and promotes students’ understanding of complex topics. Join Dr. Penny Howell as she introduces the tenets of the model and describes how you can get started incorporating meaningful talk in your own teaching.

7) Hands-On Technology Lab

(Room 6)

This casual and fun interactive session is designed to give you a hands-on opportunity to “test drive” a range of instructional hardware and software. Try out an iPad, check out some new learning apps for your smartphone, or fiddle with an iClicker and practice setting up the system. Experience “backchanneling” by tweeting on Twitter and get answers to your questions about SoftChalk, Blackboard Collaborate, GradeCenter, and Respondus. Your choice! Even “lurking” is learning in the technology lab!

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