Concurrent Sessions

Our presenters from across the university and beyond will present breakout sessions focused on sharing best practices to promote student learning and motivation. Sessions will begin at 11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.

Concurrent session presenters are from the University of Louisville unless otherwise noted.

Morning Concurrent Sessions: 11 a.m.–12 p.m.

1) Addressing Emotional and Cognitive Obstacles to Academic Performance (Room 136A)

Presenter: Rich Lewine, Professor, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, and Chair, DPBS Undergraduate Committee, College of Arts and Sciences

This session will review what appear to be gender differences in the non-academic obstacles that students face. Female students, especially those who are doing well academically, may be more susceptible to depression and anxiety in reaction to grades than are more poorly performing female students and males generally. In contrast, male students who are cognitively rigid may take substantially longer to graduate than other students. The implications of these findings for enhancing student motivation will be discussed using specific student scenarios.

2) ‘There’s Gold in Them Thar Hills’: Panning for Better Learning with a Flipped Classroom Sieve (Room 201)

Presenter: Jeffrey L. Hieb, Assistant Professor, Department of Engineering Fundamentals, J.B. Speed School of Engineering

The flipped classroom model is attracting a significant amount of attention, and there are those who see it as a panacea for higher education as well as those who are serious skeptics. This session will describe the instructor’s efforts to understand the principles of the flipped classroom model, implement it in a linear algebra course and evaluate the model's efficacy for promoting student learning. The instructor will share details about his motivation for experimenting with the flipped classroom model, technology used to implement a flipped class, the design of class activities for the flipped class, and challenges and successes encountered thus far.

3) Collaborative Learning as a Tool to Ignite the Spark in Students (Room 15)

Presenter: Anna C. Faul, Professor and Associate Dean of Academic Affairs; Thomas Lawson, Professor; and Joseph D’Ambrosio, Research Manager and Assistant Professor; and students, Kent School of Social Work

Motivating students in the mastery of difficult research and statistical concepts remains a challenge for faculty teaching in human service programs where many students are more motivated to provide services to people than to engage in difficult research projects. This session will discuss the five tenets of collaborative learning – individual accountability; mutual interdependence; face-to-face promotive interaction; appropriate practice of interpersonal skills; and regular self-assessment of team functioning - and describe how these tenets were used to ignite the spark with social work students. Both faculty and students will reflect on how collaborative learning has changed the classroom experience.

4) Special Invitation-Only Session for Department Chairs (Room 211)

This session is by invitation only.

5) Motivation Technology Lab (Room 6)

This interactive session is designed to demonstrate how faculty across the institution are using resources and technological tools to foster student motivation and learning. The fast-paced “speed dating” format invites you to choose from a range of faculty and staff-led presentations on topics as diverse as audience response systems, digital and audio essays, backchannels, instructional videos, online writing support and more.


Afternoon Concurrent Sessions: 1:30–2:30 p.m.

1) From “The Bieber Generation” to Boomers and Beyond: An Introduction to Motivation Theory as it Relates to Adult Learners (Room 136A)

Presenter: Michael L. Rowland, Associate Dean for Diversity Initiatives and Community Engagement, and Assistant Professor, School of Medicine

Drawing from research in psychology and education, this session is designed to introduce you to motivation theory as it relates to adult learning in the classroom. The session will focus on how to motivate adult learners from different generational groups across educational settings. We will explore the barriers and facilitators of adults’ motivation to learn and share practical tools and strategies.

2) Faculty Panel: Strategies for Motivating Your Students’ Learning through Lecture (Room 201)

Panelists: Paul J. DeMarco, Professor, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences and Associate Dean, School of Interdisciplinary and Graduate Studies; Barry Haworth, Assistant Professor, College of Business; Amy Holthouser, Associate Professor and Assistant Dean for Medical Education, School of Medicine; Joseph M. Steffen, Professor, Department of Biology and Chair, Faculty Senate

Moderator: Beth Boehm, Vice Provost for Graduate Affairs, School of Interdisciplinary and Graduate Studies

Whether you teach large classes or small ones, it’s likely that you have used lecture at some point in your teaching career because, as Bligh (2000) aptly put it, “in spite of opportunities for innovation provided by changing technology and research, surveys over decades show remarkably little change in the dominant use of lectures.” Since lecture is still pervasive across the academy, it is important to understand how to use this approach effectively. During this facilitated discussion, panelists will share their insights about what they have found that works and what doesn’t, and they will offer advice for how you can be more effective motivating your students’ learning through lecture.

3) What Do YOU Believe about Teaching and Learning? (Room 14)

Presenters: Nisha Gupta, Ideas to Action Specialist for Culminating Experiences; Warren (Dale) McIntosh, Instructor, Computer Information Systems, College Business; and Christy Metzger, Director, Office of First Year Initiatives

Inspired by this year’s Book-in-Common, This I Believe, this session will engage you in an exploration of beliefs about teaching and learning and how those beliefs motivate action. The presenters will facilitate self-exploration of connections between beliefs and actions in teaching, as well as demonstrate how the This I Believe book and concepts can be used to motivate students to think more deeply about their learning in content-rich courses.

4) What You Need to Know about Motivation to Help You and Your Students Do Your Best Work (136B)

Presenters: Kira Taylor, Assistant Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health; and Richard Wilson, Professor and Chair of the Department of Health Promotion and Behavioral Sciences, School of Public Health and Information Sciences

This session will explore several key concepts of motivation as described in Dr. Marilla Svinicki’s 2004 book, Learning and Motivation in the Postsecondary Classroom. In this session, you will be invited to reflect upon motivation (or lack thereof) as you find it in yourself and your students. Session presenters will describe the fundamentals of motivation theory and provide concrete suggestions and practical steps for what instructors can do to enhance motivation in their students and themselves.

5) Text to Text, Text to Self, Text to World: Designing Learning Opportunities to Use What Students Read In and Out of the College Classroom (Room 211)

Presenter: Lori A. Norton-Meier, Associate Professor, College of Education and Human Development

Comprehending and critiquing text is an essential skill for college students. This session will explore the way students read text and offer suggestions for how you can create complex learning opportunities for your students. Experiences and discussion will help participants critically examine the way they introduce reading experiences and suggest opportunities they can provide for the discussion of text that go beyond simply consuming and memorizing information.

6) Motivation Technology Lab (Room 6)

This interactive session is designed to demonstrate how faculty across the institution are using resources and technological tools to foster student motivation and learning. The fast-paced “speed dating” format invites you to choose from a range of faculty and staff-led presentations on topics as diverse as audience response systems, digital and audio essays, backchannels, instructional videos, online writing support and more.

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