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International Book Fair in Guadalajara, Mexico

Rhonda Buchanan presented in the International Book Fair in Guadalajara, Mexico

Rhonda Buchanan participated in the International Book Fair in Guadalajara, Mexico, where she was invited by the Editorial house Artes de México to present a children’s book by Gabriela Olmos,  “Soñé . . . Canto contra la violencia” (“I Dreamt . . . A Book about Hope”) on November 29, 2014. This included a discussion about alternatives to violence asking the dozens of children what if butterflies came out of guns instead of bullets. This idea was expressed in the first illustration of the book. After the interactive reading, the children created a mural in response to the murder of 43 students, whose remains have been missing since September 2014, expressing their desire for a peaceful Mexico. The presentation was so well received that Dr. Buchanan and Gabriela Olmos repeated it on November 30, 2014.

 

 

Latin American and Latino Studies Co-Sponsored SoFo Day of the Dead Celebration

2nd Annual South Fourth Street Day of the Dead Celebration held Friday, November 7, 2014

Latin American and Latino Studies Co-Sponsored SoFo Day of the Dead Celebration on Friday

The 2nd Annual SoFo Day of the Dead Celebration took place on Friday, November 7th, First Friday Trolley Hop Night on S. Fourth Street between the Seelbach and Brown Hotels.  The family-friendly affair was sponsored by the South Fourth Street Retail District, the University of Louisville’s Latin American and Latino Studies (LALS) Program, and the Louisville Downtown Partnership (LDP). In keeping with cultural tradition, several altars were installed along South Fourth Street, including an altar to Nelson Mandela (shown in photo on the right), erected by the Latin American and Latino Studies Program in collaboration with the Department of Pan African Studies, and an LALS Club altar to Maya Angelou. The Hilton Garden Inn has erected an altar to honor celebrities who have died in famous hotels. South Fourth Street radio stations have erected altars devoted to famous deceased musicians, and Craft(s) Gallery has erected an altar to honor artist Frida Kahlo. In keeping with tradition, a public altar was available for anyone to place objects for their deceased loved ones Friday night.

The LALS Club assisted with many activities for children, including face painting, sugar skull decorating, and paper flower making. Party goers were encouraged to dress in costumes, especially as Frida Kahlo or their favorite “calavera” (skeleton). La Cocina de Mama and Meta had Mexican food, beer, wine and margarita offerings for sale for festival attendees. There was entertainment, music, and dance. The event was free, open to the public and family-friendly. For more photos, visit LALS on Facebook.


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Dr. Keeling in LMPD Press Conference

LMPD released the findings from Dr. Keeling's "Vehicle Stops Report" at a press conference on 10-24-2014

Professor Deborah Keeling, Justice Administration, participated in a press conference Friday, October 24, 2014 at Louisville Metro Police Department (LMPD) headquarters. They released the findings from the "Vehicle Stops Report" that she prepared for the police department at Chief Steve Conrad’s request. This report was an analysis of a year’s worth of Louisville Metro Police traffic stops. The report was the fourth she has done for LMPD since 2004 but the first released publicly. See the full report and associated story at WFPL’s website. See more coverage on the WDRB, WLKY, and The Courier-Journal websites.


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High Energy Physics Workshop

Dr. Brown’s quotation at a High Energy Physics Workshop on Dark Matter gets noticed and University of Louisville is highlighted in BNL article by Chelsea Whyte

Professor David Brown is quoted in an article on Brookhaven National Laboratory's website while attending a High Energy Physics Workshop with nearly 80 physicists from around the world. Follow this link to the article: Dark Interactions Workshop Brings Global Physicists to Brookhaven Lab.


NSF REU Poster Session

NSF REU Poster Session - July 31, 2014

The NSF REU Poster Session took place at Kosair Charities Clinical and Translational Research Building on July 31, 2014. Chemistry students pictured from right to left are: Joel Reihmer (the presenter), Jason Young, and Nicholas Vishnosky.

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John Cumbler and American history’s 238 shades of gray

John Cumbler and American history’s 238 shades of gray - an article Written by Ricky L. Jones in LEO Weekly

John Cumbler and American history’s 238 shades of gray is
an article in LEO Weekly written by Ricky L. Jones, Ph.D., Professor and Chair, Dept. of Pan-African Studies

 

 

 

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Tad Hughes

Thomas “Tad” Hughes is PI of a study involving an assessment of the effectiveness of violence reduction strategies in a Louisville neighborhood. This community safety grant is in partnership with the Louisville Metro Police Department.

by Tad Hughes

The Parkland Project Safe Neihborhoods  federal grant involes the combination of two crime supression models.  The first model, focused deterrence,  is an innovative tactic used to supress violence. This strategy that narrowly tailors sanctions to specific individuals and/or specific criminal behaviors (for example handgun violence among gang members).   Rather than rely upon the general deterrent effect of the traditional criminal justice process, potential offenders are explicitly told that their risk of being sanctioned has increased unless they change their behavior. This model has been used successfully by many jurisdictions around the United States.  Additionally, we are working to incorporate restorative justice principles and practices into the focused deterrence model.

The second model, Hot spot policing, involved in the grant focuses upon geography.  Research indicates that very small number of very small areas (“Hot Spots”) account for a disproportionately large amount of crime. Our goal in this portion of the project is to identify these areas and treat them with focused policing efforts. Specifically, officers will be directed to randomly attend to hotspots for a short focused patrol. The goal is to have each hotspot “treated” every two hours. Research has shown this practice to be effective in reducing the crime in the hot spot areas.


Gennaro Vito and George Higgins

In partnership with the School of Pharmacy at University of Kentucky, Dr. Gennaro Vito and Dr. George Higgins are studying prescription drug monitoring programs

submitted by Gennaro Vito and George Higgins

IPOP Researchers Receive Justice Department Grant to Study Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs

Researchers from the UK College of Pharmacy’s Institute for Pharmacy Outcomes and Policy (IPOP) received a two-year, $363,000 grant from the National Institute of Justice to study prescription drug monitoring programs.

Faculty members Karen Blumenschein, Trish Freeman and Jeff Talbert are collaborating with co-investigators Gennaro Vito and George Higgins from the University of Louisville Department of Justice Administration on the project, which is entitled “Optimizing Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs to Support Law Enforcement Activity.”

The research project will evaluate the features and practices of prescription drug monitoring programs and identify those that have the greatest utility for law enforcement investigations and prosecutions.

As part of the research, data will be collected and analyzed from seven state prescription drug monitoring programs. Results from the project are expected to have an important impact, as they will provide evidence-based information on the best practices of prescription drug monitoring programs to support law enforcement activities and provide a contextual framework for future policy and program improvements designed to mitigate the crisis of prescription drug abuse, trafficking and diversion.

Vito and Higgins are responsible for the conduct of focus groups with narcotics officers and prosecutors in the states under analysis. The focus groups will be conducted to determine how the officers and prosecutors make use of the prescription drug monitoring programs to investigate and prosecute drug cases. All of the responses will be anonymous (in that names and positions will be never be listed) and confidential.


Sandie Sephton and Paul Salmon

Sandie Sephton and Paul Salmon's Current Research Studies: The Role of Mindfulness in Predicting Perceived Stress; Coping Skills for Breast Cancer Patients; Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction for Parkinson's Disease Patients and Caregivers; and Psychological Distress and Immune Disruption in Women Newly Diagnosed with Breast Cancer

by Sandie Sephton and Paul Salmon

The Role of Mindfulness in Predicting Perceived Stress, Health and Positive Adaptation in College Undergraduates (Sephton PI, Salmon Co-I).  This study aims to examine how “trait” scores of mindfulness (i.e. relatively constant measures) may predict academic stress levels, measured both by self-report and salivary cortisol. Collected in 2007 and 2008 from 85 undergraduate students, data were gathered from participants at two intervals during a semester, using multiple measures of mindfulness, stress, health behavior and psychological well-being.

iPod-Based Coping Skills for Breast Cancer Patients (Sephton, P.I.; Salmon, Co-I). The efficacy of a mindfulness-based meditation intervention to improve coping efforts, reduce perceptions of distress, and improve circadian rhythms, endocrine, and immune function will be explored among female pre-surgical breast cancer patients. The intervention, which was created and recorded by Dr. Salmon, will be provided to participants via an iPod Nano during the surgical and adjuvant treatment phases, up to 6 months following their surgery. Funded by the University of Louisville Intramural Research Grants, Research Initiation Grant and the Undergraduate Research Grant as well as the Nancy R. Gelman Foundation Seed Grant.

Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction for Parkinson's Disease Patients and Caregivers (Salmon, PI; Sephton Co-I). Working in collaboration with the University of Louisville Movement Disorder Clinic, we are conducting a pilot study of the impact of Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) on Parkinson’s patients and their primary caregivers.  Variables examined in this study include immune function, salivary cortisol, psychophysiological functioning, disease-relevant movement and balance measures, and self-reported physical and psychological functioning.
http://louisville.edu/psychology/sephton/biobehavioral/press-releases/aps-press-miami-2013

Psychological Distress and Immune Disruption in Women Newly Diagnosed with Breast Cancer (Sephton PI, Co-I’s Dhabhar (Stanford), Chagpar (Yale), Psych Dept dissertation of Liz Cash, Ph.D). Examines the associations of proinflammatory immune markers in the systemic circulation with distress and circadian disruption in a sample of newly diagnosed breast cancer patients, and examines the relationship between whole blood activation induced immunoprotective T helper (Th)-1 versus pro-inflammatory, anti-inflammatory, and Th-2 cytokine responses with distress and circadian disruption. (Funded by the Stanford Cancer Center Developmental Cancer Research Award in Translational Science).
LAB WEBSITE http://louisville.edu/psychology/sephton/biobehavioral


Yongzhi Xu

Current Research Described by Yongzhi Xu, Department of Mathematics

by Yongzhi Xu

My current research is focused on inverse scattering problems and mathematical model of breast cancer.

Inverse scattering problems

Scattering theory is concerned with the effect an inhomogeneity has on an incident wave or particle. The inverse scattering problem is to determine the unknown inhomogeneity from the knowledge of the incident wave and the measured scattered wave. Its applications include medical imaging, underwater imaging and underground imaging.

Currently I am cooperating with Professor Jun Zou of Chinese University of Hong Kong and  Professor Dinghua Xu of Zhejiang University of Technology on developing effective numerical algorithms for computer simulations.  We developed a parallel radial bisection algorithm and a direct sampling method for the inverse scattering problems, which greatly improved the existing methods.

Mathematical modeling of cancer

I continue my research on cancer modeling, analysis and computation. Developing mathematical models of tu­mor growth is an emerging field and has attracted much research in recent years.  Some models have been studied by biomathematicians. Assuming that a tumor consists of a continuum of live and dead cells, we can describe local volume changes and cell movement due to cell growth and death by a system of partial differential equations. Hence we are able to capture the early growth and developing spatial composition of the tumor.

I have been studying a special kind of cancer, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), in order to investigate possible procedures to connect free boundary model of DCIS with clinical data. The study focuses on a class of free boundary value problem models of DCIS and their comparisons with clinical data. In particular, we formulate a number of inverse problems for the well-posed free boundary valued problem related to clinical diagnose of cancer. To the best of my knowledge, there is no publication on this kind of inverse free boundary valued problems.

This research focuses on a central issue of computational bio-mathematics, which meshes well with UofL’s efforts in cancer research. A computational model of tumor growth enables scientists to use computers to study the effects of different factors related to tumor growth. It can help to find new strategies to enhance inhibitors of tumor growth.