E-Portal Newsletter - Special Spring 2009 Edition

Special Spring 2009 Edition

 

The e-Portal is one of the ways that A&S is participating in UofL's "green initiative." The e-Portal replaces the "paper version" of The Portal newsletter, previously published twice a year by the college. In addition to being more environmentally friendly, The e-Portal provides more frequent opportunities to share news of the college.
Our next issue will be in August to kick off the Fall semester.

In this issue:

A&S students and faculty receive prestigious Fulbright awards

Since 2003, UofL students and alumni have won 34 Fulbright awards, more than any other Kentucky university. The federally sponsored program each year has about 7,000 applicants and makes 1,500 grants available to scholars in 155 nations based on academic merit and leadership potential.  This year, all of the student Fulbright scholars have ties to A&S.  The college boasts 7 Fulbright student scholars and one alternate.

“It’s wonderful to see so many here,” said UofL President James Ramsey. “It showcases our success in fostering an environment where our students can achieve the highest levels of international scholarship and academic excellence.”

This year’s student recipients are:

  • Selene Black, English Teaching Assistantship in Argentina
  • Brian Hoffman, Research Grant in Malaysia
  • Wojciech Kapalczynski, Research Grant in Poland
  • Ashley Kim, English Teaching Assistantship in South Korea
  • Monica Marks, Research Grant in Turkey
  • Colin Ogilvie, English Teaching Assistantship in Brazil
  • Carl Williams, English Teaching Assistantship in Taiwan
  • Sarah Oesterly, Research Grant in Peru (Alternate)

The College is also proud to announce that these faculty received Fulbrights:

  • Dr. Susan Griffin, Department of English, Research and Teaching in Belgium
  • Dr. Hank Savitch, Department of Urban and Public Affairs, Research in Chile
  • Dr. Geetha Suresh, Department of Justice Administration, Research and Teaching in India

Physics and Astronomy opens new atmospheric science lab

 

Tornadoes, hurricanes, cold fronts, warm fronts. In the weather-rich Louisville area one may only have to walk outside to experience such weather phenomena.

Now students in the University of Louisville’s Department of Physics and Astronomy have a new place to study weather and air pollution with the April 16 opening of the new atmospheric science research and instructional lab.

The ribbon-cutting ceremony and open house were part of the department’s Spring Celebration Week 2009. The week’s activities also included a talk by 2004 Nobel Prize-winning physicist Frank Wilczek.

Students in the new atmospheric sciences program will use the lab, which includes weather maps and simulators. The department has two new degrees: the bachelor of science degree in atmospheric science and a doctorate in physics.

Department of Pan-African Studies wins national award

 

Last month the College’s Department of Pan-African Studies (PAS) was presented the Sankore Award from the National Council for Black Studies (NCBS) at the NCBS conference in Atlanta.  The Award, which was accepted by the Department Chair, Dr. Theresa Rajack-Talley, was bestowed in recognition of the significant role of the department in the field of Africana Studies.

A NCBS staff member, Summer Melay, cited a number of factors that let to the department’s selection for the award.  She commented on the quality of our PAS students and faculty, noting the scholarly productivity of the PAS faculty and citing the PAS graduate students who have won the NCBS student essay contest in 2007 and 2008.  Melay also cited the faculty’s leadership in the area of Africana Studies and the active participation of the PAS faculty and graduate students as panelists and presenters at the NCBS annual conference.   She also noted that UofL is one of only four universities in the South that offers a graduate degree in Africana Studies.

Dr.  Rajack-Talley, commented that, “Although we do not do what we do for recognition, it is always encouraging when we are recognized,” and she praised the PAS faculty and past department chairs for their contributions and leadership.

Dr. J. Blaine Hudson, Dean and Professor of Pan-African Studies, noted, “When THE professional organization in the field of Black Studies gives a department that sort of recognition, it means that we cast a very long shadow nationally--which is our goal.”

Physics and Astronomy Professor Kielkopf wins UofL Trustees Award

Dr. John Kielkopf, Professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy, is the recipient of the 2009 University of Louisville Trustees Award, which is given annually to a professor who makes outstanding contributions to student life.

Those contributions include creating and developing each of the astronomy courses at the university, developing all of the experiments in the astronomy lab and writing the lab manual. These things alone have an impact on about 1,200 undergraduate students each year.

Kielkopf, however, has done much more. Since 1977, he has directed the Moore Observatory, a comprehensive astronomical compound located 20 miles from Louisville deep within UofL’s 200-acre Horner Wildlife Refuge. He has worked throughout his career to equip the observatory with the latest technology as well as set up a reciprocal relationship with the University of Southern Queensland in Australia giving the students both here and there the opportunity to study the other hemisphere.

Kielkopf’s door is always open, noted one research assistant in the department. He always has time for students, even when his schedule is packed. In fact, Kielkopf provides independent study guidance and research mentorship to dozens of undergraduate students. He mentors at least four doctoral students and over the years has been a thesis adviser to at least 45 master's students.

“He’s a first-rate adviser, colleague and friend,” noted one former student. “He thinks about a student’s capacities and inclinations and helps each consider the options and possible futures that are at once attractive and also make sense.”

Dr. David N. Brown, Chair of the Department of Physics and Astronomy commented that “Dr. Kielkopf is a ‘do it all' kind of guy but one who does it all without fanfare. He cares about all aspects of the university but especially about its students.”

A&S outstanding faculty celebrated on April 17

At a reception hosted by Dean J. Blaine Hudson, the College recognized the exceptional work of Arts and Sciences faculty in areas of distinguished teaching; distinguished service; outstanding scholarship, research and creative activity; department leadership; and exceptional advising.

The College was pleased that several A&S faculty also received University-wide awards.  President James Ramsey honored four of our faculty on April 20 as recipients of the University-wide awards for career achievement, distinguished teaching, distinguished service to the University, and exemplary multicultural teaching.

Dean Hudson recognized these faculty members and departments as winners of the 2008-2009 A&S Distinguished Faculty Awards:

A&S Awards for Distinguished Teaching (for additional information about each award recipient, click on the name):

A&S Award for Outstanding Scholarship, Research and Creative Activity

  • Zijiang He, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences (in Basic and Applied Sciences)

  • Suzanne Meeks, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences (in the Social Sciences)

  • Raphael Njoku, Department of History (in the Social Sciences)

  • Rinda Frye, Department of Theatre Arts (in the Creative and Performing Arts)

  • John Cumbler, Department of History (Career Achievement Award) - Professor Cumbler also received the University-wide Career Achievement Award for Outstanding Scholarship, Research and Creative Activity.

College of Arts and Sciences Distinguished Service Awards

Dean Hudson also recognized Michael Fowler from the Department of Political Science for receiving the University-wide Award for Exemplary Multicultural Teaching.

Victor A. Olorunsola Endowed Research Award for Young Scholars was awarded to Keith Lyle, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, for his research project in the field of memory research.

The Arts and Sciences Dean’s Award for Outstanding Department Leadership was presented to David Brown, who has served the Department of Physics and Astronomy as Acting Chair for three years and as Chair since April 2007.

The Arts and Sciences Dean’s Award for Outstanding Departmental Advising recognizes the collective achievement of departments in providing exceptional student advising, as determined by students’ ratings on surveys. The 2008-2009 award, which recognizes the departments with an average departmental advising rating of 4.0 or higher on a scale of 1 to 5, was given to the follwing departments:  Communication, English, Fine Arts, Geography and Geosciences, Humanities, Justice Administration, Liberal Studies, Pan-African Studies, Physics and Astronomy, Political Science, Sociology, and Women’s and Gender Studies.

College celebrates recent books by A&S faculty

On April 17th, the College celebrated the accomplishments of 11 of our faculty who participated in the 2009 Book Party.   Each year, the Commonwealth Center for Humanities and Society invites faculty who have published books in the last year to display a copy of their book at an end-of the-year  gathering.   The books at this year’s party reflect a range of topics and genre in keeping with the rich diversity that is at the heart of the College of Arts and Sciences.

The works celebrated at this year’s Book Party include (to view a summary of the book, click on the author’s name):

From the Department of  Classical and Modern Languages:

  • Buchanan, Rhonda Dahl, trans. The Secret Gardens of Mogador: Voices of the Earth by Alberto Ruy-Sanchez.  New York: White Pine Press, 2009.

  • Sullivan, Clare E., trans.  A Tuesday Like Today by Cecilia Urbina.  Wings Press, 2008.

From the Department of English:

  • Biberman, Steven M., Big Sid’s Vincati: The Story of a Father, a Son, and the Motorcycle of a Lifetime.  Hudson St. Press, 2009.

From the Department of History:

  • Cumbler, John T., From Abolition to Rights for All: The Making of a Reform Community in the Nineteenth Century.  University of Pennsylvania Press, 2007.

From the Department of Justice Administration:

  • Miller, J. Mitchell, Christopher J. Schreck and Richard Tewksbury.  2008.  Criminological Theory: A Brief Introduction. 2nd Ed.  Allyn & Bacon, 2008.  (First edition 2006).
  • Vito, Gennaro F., Julie Kunselman and Richard Tewksbury. Introduction to Criminal Justice Research Methods:  An Applied Approach.  Charles C. Thomas, 2008.
  • Vito, Gennaro F., Michael Blankenship and Julie Kunselman.  Statistical Analysis in Criminal Justice and Criminology: A User’s Guide.  2nd ed. Waveland Publishing, 2008.

From the Liberal Studies Program:

  • Hale, John R., Lords of the Sea: The Epic Story of the Athenian Navy and the Birth of Democracy.  Viking Penguin, 2009.

From the Department of Pan-African Studies:

  • Carew, Joy G., Blacks, Reds and Russians: Sojourners in Search of the Soviet Promise.  Rutgers University Press, 2008.

From the Department of Urban and Public Affairs:

  • Gilderbloom, John I., Invisible City: Housing, Poverty and New Urbanism.  Texas Press, 2008.
  • Koven, Steven G., Responsible Governance: A Case Study Approach.  M.E. Sharpe, 2008.
  • Savitch, H.V., Cities in the Time of Terror: Space, Territory, and Local Resilience.  M.E. Sharpe, 2008.

A&S faculty and staff receive national advising awards

Regina Roebuck, Associate Professor in the Department of Classical and Modern Languages, and Luke Buckman, Academic Counselor Senior in the Honors Program, both received 2009 National Academic Advising Association's Certificate of Merit Awards for Outstanding Advising.  Roebuck received the award in the category of faculty advising and Buckman received the award in the category for those whose primary role is advising.  The certificate of merit awards, which are based on the evidence of qualities and practices that distinguish the nominee as an outstanding advisor, will be given at the at the National Academic Advising Association’s national conference this fall in San Antonio.  The quality and immeasurable value of their work is made evident by the following comments that their supervisors shared:

Dr. Augustus Mastri, Chair of Classical and Modern Languages, said of Dr. Roebuck, "[Her] dedication to the students is unquestionable, the amount of time she spends advising, inestimable.  To say that she is very approachable and available is an understatement."

Regarding Luke Buckman, Dr. John Richardson, Director of the University Honors Program said, "Students are in his office all hours of the workday seeking advice on everything from courses to personal issues to career choices.  He works with each student in a sincere and professional manner and never fails to give them the time that they need.  I often hear students claim that they would not know what they would do without him."

A&S students garner awards for creative writing

A&S students have done exceptionally well in creative writing contests both at the local and national levels.

Our Creative Writing students had a strong showing in  the 2009 Kentuckiana Metroversity Writing Competition. The competition featured four categories: poetry, short fiction, creative nonfiction/essay, and academic writing with undergraduate and graduate divisions in each category.  This year, an international category category was added to honor the words and experiences of people who have come to our community from all over the world.

The winners were honored at an awards ceremony and public reading in April and their entries will be published in an anthology.

This year, A&S students won in the following categories:

  • In the undergraduate divison of the fiction category, first place went to Dominic Russ for "No More Games, No More Shredded Wheat"and second place went to Amy Denham for "Bag of Money."
  • In the undergraduate division of the poetry category, first place went to Casey Creek for "The King of the Weird" and second place went to Travis Martin for "Bluegrass."  In the graduate division, first place went to Brandon Reintjes for "Gar."
  • In the graduate division of academic writing, first place went to Eric Leave for his essay "Implosions and Nostalgia in Las Vegas."

A&S Humanities PhD student Julie Wade won an award for creative non-fiction from the the Association of Writers and Writing Programs for her story "Life Under Water."  The Intro Journals Project is a national literary competition for the discovery and publication of the best new works by students currently enrolled in the nearly 700 programs  that participate in the AWP.

Nomination from a participating institution is in and of itself quite difficult given the quantity and caliber of work.  "I am grateful to Paul Griner for choosing me to represent the University of Louisville in creative nonfiction.... [and] I'm so happy that this award means an acknowledgement for the University of Louisville as well."

Along with her other awards and publications, this award bodes well for Ms. Wade's future as a writer as many AWP Intro Journals Project winners go on to very successful careers as published writers.  Ms. Wade's entry will be published in the Tampa Review.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Additional information related to previous stories:

Distinguished Faculty Awards:

Professor Robert Luginbill, Department of Classical and Modern Languages, A&S Award for Distinguished Teaching for Full-time Teaching

Professor Luginbill has taught at UofL since 1991, compiling a distinguished teaching record, including directing more than 575 students in independent study and conference classes.  Numerous letters of support from students testified to the profound care he shows for his students and the time he spends helping them in their educational pursuits.  They also point out Professor Luginbill’s inspiring classroom demeanor and his remarkably balanced teaching style--encouraging those who are having difficulties, but always moving the instruction forward and bringing to life materials that would otherwise seem distant or dry.

A number of his students noted that his inspirational teaching and his guidance moved them to pursue additional studies or a minor in the Classics, Greek or Latin, while a number of his students won travel scholarships or submitted scholarly papers for national contests.  One graduate who was seeking a position teaching Latin noted with gratitude that,  “Professor Luginbill helped me prepare for interviews, gave me insight into teaching styles, and above all, encouraged me never to give up.”

From first-year students to departing graduates, Professor Luginbill has had a consistent, broad-reaching and long lasting effect on hundreds of students.

Professor Robert Powers, Department of Mathematics, A&S Award for Distinguished Teaching for Full-time Teaching

Professor Powers has taught at the University of Louisville since 1989, compiling a distinguished record teaching at both graduate and undergraduate levels.

Many of his nomination letters noted his care for and patience with students and his enthusiasm and willingness to help.  A graduate student echoed the comments of many students when he stated that, “Professor Powers made himself available whenever possible and made me feel as though every inch of my progress and advancement was important to him.”

The department chair commented that students don’t understand how anyone can fail one of his courses -- “Not because he is easy, but because he is very persistent in getting students to come for help and goes out of his way to accommodate their time constraints.”  His chair also wrote of the endless hours he spends preparing his lectures, meeting with students, improving the curriculum and updating his teaching techniques to include the latest pedagogical and technical tools.

Professor Powers is also the recipient of the University-wide Distinguished Teaching Award.

Professor Beverly Edwards, Department of Communication, A&S Distinguished Teaching Award for Part-time Teaching

For 25 years, Professor Edwards has brought to the classroom her dynamic, engaging, and caring personal qualities, her ability to mentor students, her broad knowledge base, her ability to teach a variety of classes, and her enthusiasm for teaching.  Her nominator noted that Professor Edward’s class “was the model of cutting-edge pedagogy.   She knows how to connect and encourage students to do their best.”   Her students have also attested to her exceptional talent in the classroom and as a mentor.

Over the past five years, Professor Edwards has taught multiple sections of three separate communications courses.  She has been a representative for part-time faculty on the faculty senate, has judged the UofL public speaking contest and has worked on the curriculum for the Department of Communication.

Significantly, her teaching talents benefit her peers as well.  As one of her colleagues commented, “Bev is a trusted guide who blazed the trail long before me but remembers the journey well and always makes herself available to me and other instructors for professional mentorship.”

Professor Zijiang He, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences,  A&S Award for Outstanding Scholarship, Research and Creative Activity in Basic and Applied Sciences

As noted by his nominator and chair, Professor He has established himself as an expert in using psychological methods to investigate visual perception and cognition.

Since joining the University of Louisville in 1994, Professor He and his research team have made several seminal discoveries in the aforementioned field.  His nominator noted that his research studies of the role of visual attention in binocular rivalry perception represent classic papers in the field.

On the neural representation of large surfaces, Professor He discovered the “rule” employed by the visual system to integrate local visual images.  His work continues to be cited.

His research on space perception has led to three publications in the top-rated journal Nature, and one publication in the Psychological Review.  His nominator reported that he is clearly world renowned for this work.

In total, Professor He has published 30 peer-reviewed articles and 3 book chapters.    He has also garnered nearly $3 million in grants from the National Institutes of Health and has contributed to his profession as a grant reviewer for NIH and NSF and as Overseas Assessor for the Chinese Academy of Science.

Professor Suzanne Meeks, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, A&S Award for Outstanding Scholarship, Research and Creative Activity in the Social Sciences

Professor Meeks, who joined our faculty in 1987, has established a national reputation as a leading researcher in the field according to her department chair and nominator and letters from professionals in her field. Her research has dealt with a range of mental health issues affecting the elderly living in nursing homes, particularly the issue of depression.

Professor Meeks has secured significant levels of external funding for her research. She is currently principal investigator on a $1.5 million NIH grant for the treatment of depression in nursing homes, and she has received an additional $750,000 in external funding as well as numerous smaller grants from UofL.

Professor Meeks also has impressive scholarly accomplishments.  She has published 48 articles in refereed journals, 20 of which have been published in the last 5 to 6 years, and she has made 60 research presentations at professional conferences in the U.S. and abroad.  She has collaborated widely and productively with scholars across the country, as well as with a large number of students at UofL, often giving them the opportunity to co-publish with her.

Professor Raphael Njoku, Department of History, A&S Award for Outstanding Scholarship, Research and Creative Activity in the Social Sciences

It is rare for a relatively junior professor to be recognized with this award, but Professor Njoku’s scholarship is worthy of the honor.

Considering that Professor Njoku’s professional activity has all taken place since he came to UofL in 2003, his record is truly remarkable—his publications include 2 monographs and a co-edited book, 5 articles, and 12 book chapters.  The breadth of his scholarship is equally impressive.  His work includes studies in very different cultures, including Nigeria, Rwanda, Morocco, and Africa in general.    Professor Njoku is currently preparing one manuscript for publication and writing another.  He has delivered more than 20 conference papers and invited lectures in the United States, Canada, Europe and Nigeria.

Scholarly reviewers of his work sing his praises saying that “Professor Njoku consistently impresses with his intense and committed engagement and the instructiveness of his insights.“  One reviewer called two of his works “masterpieces” and reviewers are agreed that Professor Njoku is a significant scholar who will continue to make a great and lasting contribution to the study of African history.

Professor Rinda Frye, Department of Theatre Arts, A&S Award for Outstanding Scholarship, Research and Creative Activity in the Creative and Performing Arts

Professor Frye joined our  faculty in 1981.  She has achieved distinction as an actor and director, particularly for her work on University Theatre’s productions of Shakespeare.  In addition, she has a professional specialty as a vocal and speech coach for actors-- not only coaching actors, but also demonstrating these techniques for other coaches across the country.

One letter of support noted that because of Professor Frye’s expertise, she has become “the first resort” for dialect coach and vocal coach for the internationally renowned Actors’ Theatre of Louisville.  According to Actors’ Theatre’s Associate Director, “the actors we employ consistently comment on the clear, insightful and intelligent assistance she offers as she works with them on speech and dialect.”  Professor Frye is particularly known for her work in a range of dialects, from Elizabethan to Caribbean accents.  As her department chair stated, her work reflects “her sensitivity to the needs of an increasingly diverse community of actors and repertoire of plays.”

Professor Frye’s efforts enhance the performing arts on and off campus, and they bring national and international credit to the University of Louisville.

Professor John Cumbler, Department of History, A&S Career Achievement Award for Outstanding Scholarship, Research and Creative Activity

Professor Cumbler, who came to UofL in 1975, began his scholarly career in the field of social and economic history, specializing in labor history.  He published three books in that field, one of which—A Social History of Economic Decline— was awarded Honorable Mention as the Best Book in Urban History by the Urban History Association.  A decade ago, he began to publish in the field of environmental history and, in 2007, he expanded his focus to include the history of American civil rights movements.

As noted in his nomination, Professor Cumbler’s books constitute a notable contribution to the study of American history.  Six well-received monographs printed by prestigious presses is a remarkable output that few historians can match.  He has also contributed a considerable number of journal articles spanning a range of subjects, such as labor, poverty, gender, class and the environment.  His CV lists 41 papers delivered at scholarly conferences and speeches in the U.S. and Europe, including at Cambridge and Oxford. 
Professor Cumbler is highly regarded in the international scholarly community.  Twice in the 1980s, he served as Visiting Senior Lecturer at the Centre for the Study of Social History at the University of Warwick in England, which is one of the most prominent such centers in the world.  In the past year, Professor Cumbler was a Visiting Professor at Groningen University in the Netherlands.

Professor Cumbler is also recipient of the University-wide Career Achievement Award for Outstanding Scholarship, Research and Creative Activity.

Professor Beth Boehm, Department of English, A&S Distinguished Service Award for Service to the University

Professor Boehm, who joined our faculty in 1987, has compiled a long and distinguished list of service accomplishments.  She has navigated a remarkable range of departmental service obligations, including Vice-Chair, Director of Graduate Studies, and membership on the Watson Conference and program committee.  One nominator stated that “Because Professor Boehm has served in many roles … she contributes a unique awareness of how we function. …She is competent, proactive, and resourceful, and her efforts are uniformly directed toward accomplishing what students and faculty need.”

Her service extends far outside her department.  She has successfully served the broader University community as Chair and Vice-Chair of the Faculty Senate and its Redbook Committee and as the appointed faculty representative to the Board of Trustees.  She has also served on or chaired diverse Ad Hoc committees, task forces, and search committees, as well as innumerable institutional committees.

Letters of nomination cited the striking range and consistency of her contributions and, as one letter noted, “The University is better off for her service.”

Professor Boehm is also the recipient of the University-wide Distinguished Service Award for Service to the University.

Professor Thomas Byers, Department of English, A&S Distinguished Service Award for Service to the Community

Since joining our faculty in 1980, Professor Byers’ remarkable service has helped to enhance the face of the College and the University to our community, state, nation and the world.

Professor Byers has been responsible for securing federal grants of over $1,000,000 to support the Commonwealth Center for the Humanities and Society Summer Institutes on Contemporary American Literature.  As one letter of support noted, the 18 international visiting scholars who attend the Institute each year “leave the program transformed with the sense that the University of Louisville is indeed a world leader in innovative learning and teaching.”

Professor Byers is one of the major forces behind the College’s “Life of the Mind” Lecture Series, which has brought nationally renowned speakers to our campus and community.  He has served on committees for the Frederick Hart exhibit and the Braden Institute for Social Justice, and on the UofL Athletic Association Board of Directors.  He has served as a moderator for the Kentucky Author Forum, a committee member in the Dissent! Louisville project and has provided service as a media resource.

As his nominator stated, “After such a breathtaking list of achievements, one wonders if any sector of the University cannot have been impacted by Tom’s dynamic efforts in service.”

Victor A. Olorunsola Endowed Research Award for Young Scholars

A special award to support our new faculty is represented in the Victor A. Olorunsola Endowed Research Award for Young Scholars. Victor Olorunsola, Dean of the College of Arts & Sciences from 1987 to 1990, believed that research and the development of new ideas, together with a teaching environment supporting that research, were a core part of the College.  It was especially important to him that young faculty members have the opportunity to establish foundational research programs as early as possible in their professional careers.  To continue his efforts in this area, Carol Olorunsola established the Victor A. Olorunsola Young Scholar's Fund in memory of her husband.

This year’s Olorunsola Award will help support a research project by Professor Keith Lyle of the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences.  Professor Lyle’s research contributes to answering some of the most important questions in the field of memory research-- why some people remember more than others and whether it is possible to increase the amount that people remember.  Recent research suggests that unexpected answers may come from studying left and right handedness.   Research has shown connections between the degree of righthandedness and performance on memory tasks.

However, no systematic investigation has been conducted to determine whether the same pattern of effects on memory and memory enhancement can be obtained among left-handed individuals.  Professor Lyle’s proposed research project supported with funds from the Olorunsola Award will advance this field of study by testing for the handedness effects in strongly and weakly left-handed individuals.

Arts and Sciences Dean’s Award for Outstanding Department Leadership

The Dean’s Award for Outstanding Department Leadership provides an opportunity for the College to publicly recognize department chairs who have demonstrated leadership and fostered an environment of achievement in their respective department.  The following are just a few of the many comments about this year’s honoree, Professor David Brown, who has served the Department of Physics and Astronomy as Acting Chair for three years and as Chair since April 2007.

His colleagues shared these comments:
“Professor Brown is everything a leader should be–hard-working, ethical, caring, creative and kind.”

“Professor Brown has worked tirelessly to make the Department of Physics and Astronomy one of the best at the University.  He has been tremendously successful… Our Department has grown more in the last few years than it had in over a decade... and the department’s long-time goal of the re-establishment of the Ph.D. program has been realized.”

His former students shared these remarks:
“Professor Brown is by far the best administrator of any kind of organization I’ve ever known.  He’s able to get more things accomplished in a day than most people could do in a week…. Whenever I come to him with a question or problem he’s always helpful even when he’s very busy…he does it all while staying calm and collected.”

“Physics is hard.  Professor Brown has created a community of physics students who work together to learn and encourage each other’s interests.  This is an environment in which the majority of upperclassmen and graduate students are aware of the investment the department has made in their future…”

A&S Book Summaries

Biberman, Steven M., Big Sid’s Vincati: The Story of a Father, a Son, and the Motorcycle of a Lifetime.  Hudson St. Press, 2009.

A father and son build a legendary motorcycle and, along the way, reconstruct their relationship in this moving memoir.  Reminiscent of Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, Big Sid’s Vincati is an irresistible combination of step-by-step motorcycle construction mixed with a powerful story of fathers and sons.  It shows not only how the Bibermans built their Vincati (which was featured in Cycle World and Classic Bike) but also how the two men reconstructed their relationship.

Buchanan, Rhonda Dahl, trans. The Secret Gardens of Mogador: Voices of the Earth by Alberto Ruy-Sanchez.  New York: White Pine Press, 2009.

This is the book for which Professor Buchanan was awarded a 2006 NEA Literature Fellowship for the Translation Projects Award and also an award to participate in the 2004 Banff International Literary Translation Centre Residency Program.  She received her latest translation in February.

Weary of her lover’s insensitivity, Hassiba, banishes him from her most intimate garden and imposes a challenge on him: a night of passion in exchange for a description of one of the secret gardens of the ancient Moroccan city of Mogador, each a unique tribute to the cultivation of passion and desire.  Desperate to regain paradise lost, her lover takes on the role of “a new Scheherezade,” searching for gardens in the most unexpected corners of the city and transforming himself into a voice so that he may once again recreate the magical moment when paradise was first discovered in the body of the beloved.

Carew, Joy G., Blacks, Reds and Russians: Sojourners in Search of the Soviet Promise.  Rutgers University Press, 2008.

This is an account of the expectations and experiences of African Americans and other Blacks who left the U.S. to explore the Soviet Experiment in the 1920s and the 1930s.  It draws from rarely seen autobiographies, archival materials, interviews of descendants, and other historical accounts to broaden our knowledge about the global African diaspora and the factors which compelled peoples to make dramatic moves toward reshaping their futures.

Cumbler, John T., From Abolition to Rights for All: The Making of a Reform Community in the Nineteenth Century.  University of Pennsylvania Press, 2007.

The Civil War was not the end, as is often thought, of reformist activism among abolitionists. After emancipation was achieved, they broadened their struggle to pursue equal rights for women, state medicine, workers' rights, fair wages, immigrants' rights, care of the poor, and a right to decent housing and a healthy environment. Focusing on the work of a key group of activists from 1835 to the dawn of the twentieth century, From Abolition to Rights for All investigates how reformers, linked together and radicalized by their shared experiences in the abolitionist struggle, articulated a core natural rights ideology and molded it into a rationale for successive reform movements.

The book follows the abolitionists' struggles and successes in organizing a social movement. For a time after the Civil War these reformers occupied major positions of power, only to be rebuffed in the later years of the nineteenth century as the larger society rejected their inclusive understanding of natural rights. The narrative of perseverance among this small group would be a continuing source of inspiration for reform. The pattern they established--local organization, expansive vision, and eventual challenge by powerful business interests and individuals--would be mirrored shortly thereafter by Progressives.

Gilderbloom, John I., Invisible City: Housing, Poverty and New Urbanism.  Texas Press, 2008.

Urban scholar John Gilderbloom calls for us to look at the invisible people of homeless, eldery, disabled and minorities of all colors to understand their problems and address them with policies that work.  Gilderbloom's book looks at cities from around the world to get answers and warnings: from Amsterdam to San Francisco and Louisville to Havana.

Hale, John R., Lords of the Sea: The Epic Story of the Athenian Navy and the Birth of Democracy.  Viking Penguin, 2009.

Lords of the Sea by archaeologist John Hale draws together ancient texts, topographical studies and archaeological discoveries to recreate the story of the Athenian navy, a force of more than 200 wooden oar-powered galleys that dominated the Aegean and eastern Mediterranean through the period known as the "Golden Age of Greece" (from about 500 to 322 BCE).  The book introduces readers to the commanders and strategies behind Athens' victories at sea, but also links these maritime triumphs to the emergence of Athenian democracy, architectural monuments, literature, and political philosophy.

Koven, Steven G., Responsible Governance: A Case Study Approach.  M.E. Sharpe, 2008.

This book is designed to show readers how ethics can constrain improper behavior. To demonstrate the relationship of ethics to good government, the author presents high profile case studies that were selected for their notoriety and their ability to connect the reader to fundamental ethical questions. Themes of public interest, natural law, and rule of law provide a framework for the case studies, which include torture (Abu Ghraib), impeachment (Clinton), competence (FEMA), electoral violation (DeLay), and historical corruption (machine politics). The chapters discuss concepts that help to define responsible behavior in terms of behavior in elections, honesty and competence, and international law.

Miller, J. Mitchell, Christopher J. Schreck and Richard Tewksbury.  2008.  Criminological Theory: A Brief Introduction. 2nd ed.  Allyn & Bacon, 2008.  (First edition 2006)

This introductory primer on criminological theory provides an accessible discussion of the major theories of crime, delinquency, social deviance, and social control with an objective and neutral approach. The various theories are covered in a systematic fashion. After providing a straightforward explanation of each theory's fundamental assumptions and concepts, along with narrative about examples drawn from both real-world current events and fictitious scenarios, major criticisms are addressed. The implications of each theory for criminal and juvenile justice strategies and policy (e.g., deterrence vs. rehabilitation, crime prevention, crime prediction) are also considered.

Savitch, H.V., Cities in the Time of Terror: Space, Territory, and Local Resilience.  M.E. Sharpe, 2008.

This book is about urban terror -- its meaning, its ramifications, and its impact on city life. Written by an expert in the field, Cities in a Time of Terror draws on data from more than a thousand cities across the globe and traces the evolution of urban terrorism between 1968 and 2006. It explains what kinds of cities have become prime targets, why terrorism has become increasingly lethal, and how its inspiration has changed from secular to religious. The author describes urban terrorism as an attempt to use the city's own strength against itself, forcing it to implode, and delineates three basic logics of terrorist choices for targeting cities. The book also includes a discussion of local resilience -- the city's capacity to bounce back from attack -- and suggests how that can be sustained. Examples from New York, London, Jerusalem, Istanbul, Moscow, Paris, and Madrid illustrate the book's central themes.

Sullivan, Clare E., trans.  A Tuesday Like Today by Cecilia Urbina.  Wings Press, 2008.

This is a novel that moves geographically between Mexico and Cambodia and chronologically between the present and the American Old West.  In suspenseful tales told among the characters at night it explores how our global realities link us all.

Vito, Gennaro F., Julie Kunselman and Richard Tewksbury. Introduction to Criminal Justice Research Methods:  An Applied Approach.  Charles C. Thomas, 2008.

This text is an introduction to research methods that emphasizes policy and program evaluation.

Vito, Gennaro F., Michael Blankenship and Julie Kunselman.  Statistical Analysis in Criminal Justice and Criminology: A User’s Guide.  2nd ed. Waveland Publishing, 2008.

This text is an introduction to statistical analysis of crime data using SPSS.