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Undergraduate Programs

 

The Department of Fine Arts and the Hite Art Institute of the University of Louisville offers undergraduate degrees in Art History and Studio Arts. The faculty are committed to providing our graduates with technical competence, aesthetic judgment and a strong dedication to artistic quality within the framework of a solid liberal arts background. All undergraduate students in the Department of Fine Arts are required to complete a non-art academic program of General Education requirements.


Bachelor of Arts in Art History

The Department of Fine Arts offers the Bachelor of Arts (BA) in the Art History. The most comprehensive undergraduate degree in the College, the BA is awarded to students who have completed both college-wide requirements and the the requirements of the major. The Art History Program introduces students to the history and appreciation of the visual arts. For the undergraduate wishing to major in Art History, the Program provides in-depth study in Ancient, Medieval, Byzantine, Islamic, Renaissance, Baroque, Modern, and Contemporary western, as well as Asian and Non-western art and architecture.

Admission

Admission to this program is selective. Students who wish to major in fine arts specializing in Studio Art or Art History must submit an Application for Admission for a Major in Fine Arts to the Department of Fine Arts. Acceptance depends on satisfactory academic performance, and artistic, educational, and career goals which meet the Departmental standard. Art history applicants must submit an essay which demonstrates sufficient grammar and writing skills, an understanding of the concept of basic descriptive analysis, and the ability to succeed in the art history coursework.

Applicants must meet the minimum overall grade point standards for the College of Arts & Sciences. This means students must be in "Good Standing" and have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0 for consideration.

Curriculum

The Art History curriculum includes a broad range of courses from introductory classes for non-art majors to advanced graduate seminars on specialized topics. The program offers courses at all levels in the areas of faculty expertise, covering Greek, Roman, Byzantine, Islamic, Early Christian, Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, African, African-American, American, Modern, Contemporary, and Asian art and architecture. There are also courses in the history of graphic design, historic interiors, curatorial studies, and the history of drawing and prints.

In addition, a grade of "D" in any department course 300-level or above may not be used to fulfill a departmental requirement.

Completing the BA in Art History

Completion of this program requires work to be submitted for the department's Learning Outcome Measurement. To meet this requirement, graduating seniors must submit an advanced level art history paper to the Art History Office. For more information, contact the department.

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Bachelor of Arts in Studio Art

The Department of Fine Arts and the Hite Art Institute offers undergraduate Studio Art majors the choice of two degrees: Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Fine Arts. The Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree is primarily intended as a program for art students who wish to receive a broad experience in studio practice within the context of a liberal arts education.

Admission

Admission to this program is selective. Students who wish to major in fine arts specializing in Studio Art or Art History must submit an Application for Admission for a Major in Fine Arts to the Department of Fine Arts.Acceptance depends on satisfactory academic performance, and artistic, educational, and career goals which meet the Departmental standard. Studio Art applicants must submit a portfolio which shows artistic potential and demonstrates an aptitude for perceptual and conceptual development. (Students without a portfolio should complete ART 101, Fundamentals of Drawing and Design, to acquire more experience and build a portfolio toward application.)

Applicants must meet the minimum overall grade point standards for the College of Arts & Sciences. This means students must be in "Good Standing" and have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0 for consideration.

Curriculum

Students are required to complete the Foundations curriculum plus a minimum of four courses at the 300 level in different studio areas and six hours at the 500 level. Courses can be taken in the areas of: painting, drawing, glass, sculpture, clay, printmaking, photography, interior architecture, graphic design, fibers, papermaking and special topics (see online course scheduling for current offerings).

In addition, a grade of "D" in any department course 300-level or above may not be used to fulfill a departmental requirement.

Completing the BA in Studio Arts

Completion of this program requires work to be submitted for the department's Learning Outcome Measurement. To meet this requirement, graduating seniors must submit eight images from their 300-level studio art courses, a statement, and complete a short questionnaire. For more information contact the department.

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Bachelor of Fine Arts

The Department of Fine Arts and the Hite Art Institute offers The Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) degree, which is primarily intended for professionally oriented art students and those planning to pursue graduate work in studio arts. The BFA provides the opportunity for students to go into more depth in the studio arts. The 2D and 3D Studio tracks allow students to customize their degree to either focus primarily on a specific studio area or to work cross-media taking courses in several studio areas.

Admission

Admission to this program is selective and competitive. Enrollments are limited.

Current BA students may apply to the BFA program after having completed the Foundations Program in Studio Art, or equivalent, plus having completed or currently enrolled in the 300-level course in the program track area for which they intend to apply. Students must also have a minimum GPA of 3.0 in studio art and art history classes and a minimum overall GPA of 2.25 to be admitted and to remain in the program. Beginning Spring 2014 students interested in applying to the BFA program in Communication Art and Design will apply while enrolled in the ART 205 Foundation Design Methods course. If accepted to the BFA program, students take additional courses at the 500-level in one of the four BFA program tracks: 2D Studios, 3D Studios, Communication Art & Design, or Interior Architecture.

Curriculum

Students complete a minimum of 61 hours of their undergraduate work in the Department of Fine Arts. All BFA students must complete:

  1. The four Foundations studio courses.
  2. Two 300-level studio art courses.
  3. 12 hours in Art History, including two survey courses.
  4. The professional practice course for their specific track
  5. Studio art courses specific to their track as outline below:

2-D Studios: In addition to the above requirements, students will take up to 15 hours of courses at the 500-level in either drawing, painting, photography, or printmaking, plus 15 hours in studio art or art history electives.

3-D Studios: In addition to the above requirements, students will take up to 15 hours of courses at the 500-level in either ceramics, fibers, glass, sculpture, or installation and site specific work, plus 15 hours in studio art or art history electives.

Communication Art & Design: In addition to the above requirements, students will take 24 hours of courses at the 500-level in graphic design plus 6 hours in studio art or art history electives.

Interior Architecture: In addition to the above requirements, students will take up to 25 hours of courses at the 500-level in courses in interior design, plus 6 hours in studio art or art history electives.

In addition, a grade of "D" in any department course 300-level or above may not be used to fulfill a departmental requirement.

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BFA in 2-D Studios

The 2D Studio track allows students to customize their degree to either focus primarily on a specific studio area or to work cross-media taking courses in several studio areas. In addition to the basic requirements of the BFA, students in a 2D, BFA track will take up to 15 hours of courses at the 500-level in either painting, drawing, printmaking, or photography, plus 15 hours of studio art or art history electives.

Painting

The painting program offers instruction at all levels. Based upon the premise that excellent painting may occur within a tradition, or outside of it, our program adheres to no single school of thought, but is structured to allow students to begin to develop their own vision through disciplined training.

While beginning painting students are given a solid foundation in the discipline, advanced students, depending upon their respective stages of development, are encouraged to explore avenues of expression pertinent to their own interests. A primary objective of the program is to encourage awareness among students that learning about oneself and the world in which one lives is as important as developing visual skills.

Large studios with north light afford painting students on all levels ample working space. Studios remain open for students’ use at times other than class hours. An unencumbered area in advanced painting is reserved for viewing paintings in progress and for critiques. Models are available for those students involved in figurative work.

The department’s Visiting Artists Program continues to bring notable painters to campus to speak about their own work and to critique students’ efforts.

For further information regarding the Painting Program, please contact:

Professor Mark Priest Email Mark Priest
Phone: 502.852.1016

Professor Gabrielle Mayer
Email Gabrielle Mayer
Phone: 502.852.0803

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Drawing

The drawing program consists of intermediate and advanced level courses for students who wish to pursue drawing as an area of specialization or to develop their drawing skills in relation to other studio areas. Students may work in a variety of traditional media, including graphite, charcoal and pastel, and are encouraged to explore the use of new and mixed media as well. Our program allows work in either abstract or realistic idioms. Regular courses are supplemented by a visiting artist program and by special topic courses, such as Landscape Drawing and Anatomy and Life Drawing.

A large well-equipped studio provides individual working spaces for non-figurative drawing and ample community space for complex projects and drawing from live models.

For further information regarding the Drawing Program, please contact:

Professor James Grubola
Email James Grubola
Phone: 502.852.6794

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Printmaking

The printmaking program provides breadth and versatility through both its facilities and its faculty. Students are instructed in all traditional printmaking processes: relief (Woodcuts and Linocuts), Intaglio (Etching and Engraving), Serigraphy (Silkscreen), and Lithography; and are also able to work with newer technologies such as photo processes and computer designs.

The printmaking program currently has a digital lab (Mac-based), complete with medium format color printer, laser printer, and scanner. Students use this equipment to combine digital imaging with traditional printmaking methods. Digital imaging is an excellent tool for doing preparatory work for traditional print processes.

The program emphasizes personal expression and encourages original and serious contemporary concepts in printmaking. Students are encouraged to develop historical perspective in their work, as well as, consider the works of contemporary artists.

The Visiting Artists Program brings nationally recognized professionals and scholars in historical, contemporary and technical areas of printmaking to campus each year to lecture about their work, demonstrate special techniques, and work one on one with students. Field trips to important print exhibitions and to museums are also a feature of the program.

For further information regarding the Printmaking Program, please contact:

Professor John Whitesell
Email John Whitesell
Phone: 502.852.0828

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Photography

The photography program explores the unique qualities of the medium and its possibilities for personal expression. Through a series of visual assignments, students experiment with the various reasons for making photographs: as documents, as images designed and directed by the photographer, and as social commentary. Instruction is tailored to the individual student’s needs and abilities with the hope that each one will find her or his own voice.

Students learn fundamental camera, darkroom and electronic imaging skills necessary for convincing picture making. While photographic technique is stressed, emphasis is always given to ideas and how to make those ideas visual and exciting.

In addition to the studio courses, all photography students are required to take a class in the history of photography. The photographic facilities include a large twenty station darkroom, a ten station digital lab equipped with scanners and large format inkjet printers, a dedicated lab for historic and alternative photographic processes and a studio equipped with professional lighting equipment and view cameras.

The photography curriculum is designed to keep a fine balance of both traditional analogue and digital photographic practices.

For further information regarding the Photography Program, please contact:

Professor Mitch Eckert
Email Mitch Eckert
Phone: 502.852.0870

Professor Mary Carothers
Email Mary Carothers
Phone: 502.852.0836

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BFA in 3-D Studios

The 3D Studio track allows students to customize their degree to either focus primarily on a specific studio area or to work cross-media taking courses in several studio areas. In addition to the basic requirements of the BFA, students in a 3-D BFA track will take up to 15 hours of courses at the 500-level in either glass, sculpture, ceramics, or fiber, plus 15 hours of studio art or art history electives.

Glass

The glass program provides thorough training to undergraduate students in the development of technical skills for the manipulation of glass in both hot and cold states.

The Hite Art Institute offers Introduction to Hot Glass, a 300 level course intended for beginners with no experience. In it, students learn the fundamentals of hot glass and glassblowing. The focus is on the primary skills needed to create basic shapes from hot glass. Students learn techniques including gathering glass, using tools and creating different shapes on the blowpipe. A variety of vessel forms are demonstrated with an emphasis on teamwork and communication. Advanced Glassmaking Techniques is a 500 level course offered to students who have completed the 300 level introductory class. In this level students expand upon the techniques learned at the introductory level and experiment with and create new shapes in their work.

Classes are taught at the Cressman Center, on the corner of First and Main.

The Visiting Artists Program brings nationally recognized glass artists to campus each year to lecture on their work, demonstrate techniques and meet with students for individual and group critique.

For further information regarding the Glass Program, please contact:

Professor Ché Rhodes
Email Ché Rhodes
Phone: 502.852.0277

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Sculpture

The sculpture program provides an opportunity for development on many levels. Upon entering the program, students learn basic skills with tools and materials and begin an investigation of spatial organization and communication through three-dimensional form.

Advanced courses offer an opportunity to develop both conceptually and technically in sculpture. Working with a variety of media, students are introduced to genres within the discipline, from fabrication of the discrete object to installation. Through group discussion and critique students develop the skill of critical thinking and learn to view their work within a social and historical context.

The sculpture studio is a spacious, modern facility with a complete woodshop, metal fabrication equipment, and areas for working with plaster, clay and stone.

The Visiting Artists Program brings a number of nationally recognized sculptors to campus each year to lecture on their work. It provides students with the opportunity for individual instruction from sculptors of national significance and enriches the critical dialogue within the program.

For further information regarding the Sculpture Program, please contact:

Professor Scott Massey
Email Scott Massey
Phone: 502.852.6863

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Ceramics

Taught within the context of a broad liberal arts curriculum, the ceramics program places strong emphasis on developing a repertoire of fundamental techniques that give students a basis for further experimentation.

An unusually high number of our graduates continue to work professionally in the field, teaching and supporting themselves as ceramicists.

The program has studio facilities equipped with throwing, hand-building, and firing clay, with electric and gas kilns for high temperature reduction techniques.

In addition to the regular course offerings with our faculty, we feature annual workshops conducted by internationally acclaimed artists.

For further information regarding the Ceramics Program, please contact:

Professor Todd Burns
Email Todd Burns
Phone: 502.852.6796

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Fiber

The fiber program provides instruction in two major areas: surface design and fiber construction. The fiber curriculum includes traditional and nontraditional techniques, not as an end in themselves, but as a means to develop a vocabulary for contemporary expression. The design process and its relationship to materials and techniques is stressed at introductory levels. Advanced students are encouraged to focus and develop a strong personal direction.

The fiber studio has facilities for dying, printing and papermaking and is organized to accommodate a broad range of surface design processes. An adjacent weaving area provides space for loom and off-loom processes including tapestry, basketry, and feltmaking.

Nationally recognized artists and professionals in textile related fields are often invited to lecture and conduct workshops.  We use our regional galleries and museums as resources for both contemporary and historical work in fiber.

For further information regarding the Fibers program, please contact:

Professor Lida Gordon
Email Lida Gordon
Phone: 502.852.0906

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Communication Art & Design

Graphic design, the planning and development of visual communication, is a very broad discipline. Designers create books, magazines, visual identification systems, web sites, packaging, advertising, architectural graphics, information graphics, museum displays, and many other applications. However diverse in its usage, all graphic design shares the same purpose–the articulate exchange of information between people through the use of image and word. (The AIGA Career Guide provides an excellent resource for people considering this field.)

The Communication Art & Design studio art track is a professional preparatory program leading to the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree. It is intended to prepare students to eventually assume leadership positions in the field of graphic design. The Communication Art & Design program at the Hite Art Institute is focuses on three aspects: conceptual development, compositional eloquence, and technical proficiency. These aims are accomplished through both hand and computer-based work.

Admission

The Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) degree is primarily intended for professionally oriented students. Admission is highly selective and enrollments are limited. We currently accept a maximum of 15 students a year into the BFA program.Presently accepted majors for the BA in studio art who have completed the Foundations Program (ART 105, 106, 115, and 116), plus have completed or are currently enrolled in ART 371 Introduction to Graphic Design, have a combined GPA in art and art history classes of 3.0 or above, and a minimum overall GPA of 2.25 are eligible to apply for the BFA program by completing a BFA Application in the Department of Fine Arts. BFA Applications for Communication Art & Design are reviewed once yearly in November. 

Beginning Spring 2014 presently accepted majors for the BA in studio art who have completed a minimum of two 100 level courses in the Foundations Program (ART 105 – Foundation 2-D Design, ART 106 – Foundation 3-D Design, ART 107 – Foundation Drawing), and are enrolled in ART 205 – Foundation Design Methods (spring only), have a combined GPA in art and art history classes of 3.0 or above, and a minimum overall GPA of 2.25 are eligible to apply for the BFA program by completing a BFA Application in the Department of Fine Arts. BFA Applications for Communication Art & Design will be reviewed once yearly in April. 

BFA Candidacy

Once admitted to the BFA program, students are expected to work closely with their mentor towards completion of the degree. All candidates must maintain an overall GPA of 2.25 or above and a departmental GPA of 3.00 or above to remain in the BFA program once accepted.

Communication Art & Design candidates must meet with their mentor each semester to ensure they are performing adequately and following the proper class sequence.

Completing the BFA in Communication Art & Design

In addition to completing the curricular requirements, BFA candidates must also pass their program’s capstone requirement, part of the department’s Learning Outcome Measurement. The Communication Art & Design capstone consists of the student’s successful completion of the Professional Development course and presentation of a portfolio of work to professionals in the field during the Portfolio Day event.

Additional information about our Communication Art & Design Program:
Communication Art & Design Program Report 2011 [pdf]

Internship Program Guildelines [pdf]


For further information regarding the Communication Art & Design Program, please contact:

Professor Steven Skaggs
Email Steven Skaggs
Phone: 502.852.0807

Leslie Friesen, Power Creative Designer-in-Residence
Email Leslie Friesen
Phone: 502.852.3605

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Interior Design

The Interior Design studio art track is a professional preparatory program leading to the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree. Program coursework is based upon the dual strategies of conceptual development and technical proficiency and is intended to prepare students to assume leadership positions in the field. In addition, the program is accredited by the Council for Interior Design Accreditation (CIDA), an independent, non-profit accrediting organization for interior design education programs at colleges and universities in the United States and Canada.

The Interior Design Program is based upon dual strategies: conceptual development and technical proficiency.

Creative thinking in Interior Design has a close relationship to all forms of artistic activity. Good designers use an understanding of society and culture to form critical judgments about people's lives.

Conceptually, our Interior Design program is based upon the principles of Interior Architecture as defined by John Kurtich and Garret Eakin in their book Interior Architecture. These include an emphasis upon the enclosing structure, both as a reference, and as a guide for the selection of furnishings, the importance of both three and four dimensional design thinking, the importance of light, and the use of color and materials to impart a human character.

University of Louisville studio and seminar settings are used to integrate these and other diverse liberal arts ideas with the practical and technical requirements of Interior Design

Admission

The Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) degree is primarily intended for professionally oriented students. Admission to this program is highly selective and enrollments are limited. Currently accepted majors for the BA in studio art who have completed the Foundations Program (ART 105, 106, 115, and 116) (beginning Fall 2013 ART 105, 106, 107, and one 200 level course from 205, 206, or 207), plus have completed or are currently enrolled in ART 361 Introduction to Interior Design, have a GPA in art and art history classes of 3.00, and a minimum overall GPA of 2.25 are eligible to apply for the program. BFA Applications for Interior Architecture are reviewed once yearly in November. If accepted to the program, students will take up to 25 hours of courses at the 500-level in interior design plus 6 hours in studio art or art history electives. 

BFA Candidacy

Once admitted to the BFA program, students are expected to work closely with their mentor towards completion of the degree. All candidates must maintain an overall GPA of 2.25 or above and a departmental GPA of 3.00 or above to remain in the BFA program once accepted. Interior Design candidates must meet with their mentor each semester to ensure they are performing adequately and following the proper class sequence.

Completing the BFA in Interior Design

In addition to completing the curricular requirements, BFA candidates must also pass their program’s capstone requirement, part of the department’s Learning Outcome Measurement. The Interior Design capstone consists of the student’s successful completion of the Professional Development course and presentation of a portfolio of work to professionals in the field during the Portfolio Day event.

 

BFA in Interior Architecture – Student Achievement

 
Job placement Rates
 

80% of the students that graduated in May 2012 were employed.

100% of the students that graduated in May 2013 were employed.

75% of the students that graduated in May 2014 were employed by June 2014.

 
Acceptance Rates into Graduate Programs


100% of our students that applied graduate school were accepted in 2012.

N/A: none applied from the class of 2013, and 2014.

 
Graduation Rates 


100% of the students from the class of 2013 who entered upper division courses (junior) graduated in 4 years.

 
Retention Rates


93% of the students enrolled during the 2013 Spring semester are returning for the Fall 2013 semester to continue their degree program in interior design. 

 

 

For further information regarding the BFA in Interior Design, please contact:

Professor Moon-he Baik
Email Moon-he Baik
Phone: 502.852.0945

Professor Kyoungmee Kate Byun
Email Kyoungmee Kate Byun
Phone: 502.852.0979

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