UofL Department of Anthropology News & Events

UofL Department of Anthropology News Feed

Prof. DiBlasi to Appear on KET Tomorrow Evening

Anthropology Prof. Phil DiBlasi will appear on KET KY- The Kentucky Channel, tomorrow evening at 5PM. Prof. DiBlasi runs the archaeology lab at UofL and will be speaking about the Eastern Cemetery Project.


KET KY – The Kentucky Channel
(Ch. 192 on TWC, other channels): Thursdays at 5 p.m.

Thursday, Feb. 11: CEHD professors Brad Shuck, Kevin Rose and Matt Bergman discuss research on horrible, dysfunctional bosses; Anthropology professor Phil DiBlasi talks about Eastern Cemetery case and trying to find loved ones of double-buried corpses

    African Night: Celebrating The Future on February 20, 2016 from 6-10PM

    Students, faculty, and community members are invited to attend this event, now in its 15th year. The event is hosted by the African Student Union and UofL, and this year the Anthropology Department is co-sponsoring the event. Please view the flyer for all details.

    New Workshop in Discourse and Semiotics

    Students and faculty interested in linguistic anthropology should consider participating and/or attending a new workshop in discourse and semiotics. More information regarding the workshop may be found here.

    Graduate Research Conference Abstracts DUE Feb 12th

    All graduate students are encouraged to submit abstracts to the Graduate Research Conference at UofL, hosted by the Graduate Student Council. This is an interdisciplinary regional conference, highlighting the best research conducted by UofL graduate and professional students. Students who have submitted to other conferences are welcome to submit those abstracts to this institutional conference. A wide variety of presentation formats are available- podiums, posters, 3-minute thesis, and participation in a community engagement symposium. There will be keynote addresses, professional development workshops, and panel discussions. Please refer to the event flyer for all the details:

     

    GSC Research and Travel Funding Applications Now Available

    Research Fund Applications are due February 19th: http://louisville.edu/…/forms/graduate-research-fund-reques…

    Travel Fund Applications are first come first served: see the GSC website for details.

    Prof. Jeneen Wiche profiled by the Louisville Cardinal

    To read the Louisville Cardinal's article on professor Wiche, follow this link.

    2016 Ethnographic Field School in Belize


    ETHNOGRAPHIC FIELD SCHOOL
    Dates: May 31-June 29, 2016 (30 Days/29 Nights)
    Price and Deadline: T.B.A. (includes airfare, ground transportation,
    accommodations, breakfast, dinner, and excursions)
    Credit: 3 hours (undergraduate or graduate)


    Community-based research coupled with ethnographic methods training in Belize, an
    English speaking country in Central America!
    • Experience Belizean culture for three and one half weeks doing ethnography!
    • Be a part of a community-based research project on the impact of agricultural
    development on peasant farming families!
    • Develop skills in ethnographic methods of data collection!
    • Analyze and summarize your own original ethnographic data!
    • Write an original ethnographic field report, which may lead to presentations at
    regional, national and international conferences as well as publications!
    In addition to conducting community-based research, students will visit the Belize Zoo,
    Banquitas House of Culture, Cuello's Distillery, Lamanai Maya Ruins (via boat on
    the New River), Nohoch Che'en Caves Branch Archaeological Reserve (Cave
    Tubing), and the Tower Hill (Sugar Cane) Factory.

    For more information, including scholarships
    and fundraising techniques, visit: http://cfaa.nku.edu

    Archaeology Field School 2016 in Cheshire

     

    THE POULTON PROJECT ARCHAEOLOGY COURSES

    TRAINING COURSES AT POULTON, CHESHIRE, 2016

     

    The Poulton Project is a multi-period rural excavation 3 miles south of Chester, which has produced extensive evidence for 10,000 years of human activity. The site was discovered during the search for a lost Cistercian Abbey, when excavation unexpectedly revealed the foundations of a medieval Chapel and associated graveyard, with an estimated 2000 burials. Continual research has also uncovered Mesolithic flints (indicative of a seasonal hunting camp) and later tools of Neolithic and Bronze Age farmers. Notably, the site contains the largest Iron Age lowland settlement discovered west of the Pennines. An extensive and high status Roman landscape is indicated by structures, industry, and field boundaries, which have produced a large assemblage of ceramics, metal, and building material.

    The Poulton Project offers students the opportunity to excavate well-preserved archaeology from a variety of periods. Currently, Iron Age roundhouses, Roman industrial structures, field boundaries, and the Medieval Chapel and graveyard are available in our field courses.

    The dates for the 2015 season are March 21sth-April 15th and 27th June-27st August

    Student fees are as follows:

     

    £190 per week if booking one week only

    £185 per week per week if booking for two weeks

    £180 per week if booking for three weeks

    £175 per week if booking for four weeks

    Please note that no accommodation is offered, but there are several camp sites and B&B accommodation available locally. Details and assistance in locating suitable accommodation will be provided. The courses are designed as an introduction to excavation techniques, plan and section drawing, context recording, photography, finds processing and surveying. 25% deposit required when booking.

    Website: www.poultonresearchproject.co.uk

    Contact: Kevin Cootes e-mail: kvecootes@hotmail.co.uk

    The project supplies all tools and equipment, mess tents, toilets and facilities for tea, coffee, etc. Students need to bring suitable digging clothes, footwear and lunch.

    The Poulton Research Project is a registered charity. Number: 1094552

     

    THE POULTON PROJECT ARCHAEOLOGY COURSES

    TRAINING COURSES AT POULTON, CHESHIRE, 2016

    The Poulton Project is a multi-period rural excavation 3 miles south of Chester, which has produced extensive evidence for 10,000 years of human activity. The site was discovered during the search for a lost Cistercian Abbey, when excavation unexpectedly revealed the foundations of a medieval Chapel and associated graveyard, with an estimated 2000 burials. Continual research has also uncovered Mesolithic flints (indicative of a seasonal hunting camp) and later tools of Neolithic and Bronze Age farmers. Notably, the site contains the largest Iron Age lowland settlement discovered west of the Pennines. An extensive and high status Roman landscape is indicated by structures, industry, and field boundaries, which have produced a large assemblage of ceramics, metal, and building material.

    The Poulton Project offers students the opportunity to excavate well-preserved archaeology from a variety of periods. Currently, Iron Age roundhouses, Roman industrial structures, field boundaries, and the Medieval Chapel and graveyard are available in our field courses.

    The dates for the 2015 season are March 21sth-April 15th and 27th June-27st August

    Student fees are as follows:

    £190 per week if booking one week only

    £185 per week per week if booking for two weeks

    £180 per week if booking for three weeks

    £175 per week if booking for four weeks

    Please note that no accommodation is offered, but there are several camp sites and B&B accommodation available locally. Details and assistance in locating suitable accommodation will be provided. The courses are designed as an introduction to excavation techniques, plan and section drawing, context recording, photography, finds processing and surveying. 25% deposit required when booking.

    Website: www.poultonresearchproject.co.uk

    Contact: Kevin Cootes e-mail: kvecootes@hotmail.co.uk

    The project supplies all tools and equipment, mess tents, toilets and facilities for tea, coffee, etc. Students need to bring suitable digging clothes, footwear and lunch.

    The Poulton Research Project is a registered charity. Number: 1094552

    David Hershberg Scholarship 2016 for Study Abroad- DUE FEBRUARY 19th

    Click here for the application!

    The Board of Directors of the World Affairs Council of Kentucky & Southern Indiana (WAC) is pleased to announce the David Hershberg Scholarship for international study in the summer of 2016.

    The grant was established by the Hershberg family and is administered by the World Affairs Council of & Southern Indiana. The WAC is an organization whose mission is to improve intercultural understanding through collaboration, coalition-building, diversified programming, and increased community involvement. A selection committee will evaluate applications on the basis of academic merit and the importance of study abroad for the personal, intellectual, and professional development of the candidate.

    Scholarship funds of at least $1500 can be used to help defray the costs of international travel, lodging, and maintenance for a period of at least 21 days of study or research outside the United States.

    Why:
    The purpose of this award is
    (1) to enable the recipient to have an international experience of at least 21 days outside the United States as part of his/her educational development and
    (2) to provide an opportunity for the recipient to further his/her knowledge of cultures, languages, and societies in other parts of the world.

    Who:
    Eligibility for this grant is limited to any full time degree seeking student currently enrolled in a degree seeking program at any accredited institution of higher learning in Metro Louisville and contiguous counties in Kentucky and Indiana. It is also available to any full time degree-seeking student whose permanent residence is in the same area and attends an accredited institution of higher learning outside the area. (See below for a complete list of counties this applies to.)

    Selected recipients of the David Hershberg Scholarship are required to prepare a 10-15 video or PowerPoint presentation of their overseas experiences, and present it at a WAC sponsored event.

    When:
    Application deadline is February 19, 2016
    Awards will be announced between end of March and early April 2016 for educational activities to take place between May and September 2016.

    How:
    To apply for The David Hershberg Scholarship, candidates must submit all appropriate documentation to WAC which is to be received by no later than 4:00 pm on February 19, 2016. Hand-delivered sealed applications will be accepted up until that time. Applications that do not have all requested material by February 19, 2016 will NOT be eligible for the award.

    One (1) copy of each of following materials is required:
    • A resume indicating relevant academic and work experience plus any previous
    international experiences. Resume must contain name, both current and
    permanent addresses, email address and phone numbers. Clearly label which
    address is to be used for contact.
    • A personal statement (maximum 500 words) explaining the reasons for wishing
    to study abroad and outlining what the candidate hopes to achieve by
    participating in this program. The committee looks for creative programs that can
    make a positive contribution to society as well as to their academic program and
    career path.
    • A description of the educational activities to be pursued during the summer,
    e.g., research project, a language study program, work internship, course
    enrollment, or other.
    • A travel itinerary and estimated budget, specifying additional sources of
    funding to which he/she will have access and/or for which he/she intends to
    apply.
    • Two (2) letters of recommendation, at least one of which should be an
    academic reference on university letterhead. These letters must be submitted in
    a sealed envelope and sent separately by the instructor or person
    recommending the student to the address below; please note that letters of
    recommendation must be received by February 19, 2016. Faxed or e-mailed
    letters will NOT be accepted.
    • Official transcripts of all post-secondary education issued from university
    registrars. Transcripts are to be mailed directly from the university registrar
    offices in a sealed envelope to the address below.

    Where:

    Applications are accepted electronically or by mail.
    •  By email (except for transcripts and recommendation letters): send completed
    applications in PDF file to contact@worldkentucky.org, with the subject line,
    “Hershberg Scholarship 2016”
    •  By mail:
    The David Hershberg Scholarship
    World Affairs Council
    200 West Broadway
    Suite 607
    Louisville, KY 40202

    AAA 2016 SUMMER INTERNSHIP PROGRAM - APPLY NOW!

    Do you have an interest in marine archaeology or African art? Maybe you just want a productive way to spend your summer getting hands-on experience working in anthropology as well as in an office environment. Whatever your career goals may be, the AAA internship program provides two exceptional students with the opportunity to spend a summer earning valuable work experience and living in Washington, DC.

    "I appreciated the reality of the internship, the kindness of the people I worked with and the glimpse of world-applicable work that I received," said 2015 AAA Summer intern, Emily Haver. "The things I treasure most are the connections I made with fellow archaeologists and culture enthusiasts, and the ideas they gave to lead me to my next steps in anthropology."

    Funded entirely by member donations, AAA internships are six weeks in length, running from the end of June through August. The internships are unpaid, but interns will be provided housing and a meal/travel stipend.

    Interns will spend the majority of their time working on-site at either the Naval History & Heritage Command or the Smithsonian National Museum of African Art. Individuals selected for the program will also have the opportunity to work on special projects at the AAA offices in Arlington, VA.

    Download and submit your application and supporting materials here: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__projects.americananthro.org_internship_&d=AwIFAg&c=SgMrq23dbjbGX6e0ZsSHgEZX6A4IAf1SO3AJ2bNrHlk&r=BijBVFt7inteN1QtyyzsQUH3eEFh0lkHl3-Wq3dtkXo&m=Wfxw7DQiK-H6Ki8XFA1klNsxYec0U_EKmEnoAaE1_Fs&s=5Z_H6QZNnp1A1mtjQMneJ3l_GB-V4ZynZwtuAV12aCQ&e= .

    2016 LGBT-studies Study Abroad in Argentina

    2016 LGBT-studies Study Abroad in Argentina

    Students will gain first-hand experience with the LGBT community in through visits to various LGBT advocacy organizations in Buenos Aires,lectures on gender and queer issues, and research on legal and community progress toward LGBT equality.  They will explore Argentinian culture through volunteering with local organizations and touring Buenos Aires with stops at significant historical sites.  In order to debrief and prepare presentations on a topic of their choice, the students will next travel to Salta where they will consider the experiences they had in the city and discuss what they learned.

    Academically, the course is three credits and includes pre-departure online reading and preparation along with monthly team meetings to get to know other students, discuss tips for traveling abroad, and complete required paperwork.  Dr. Anne Caldwell of the Political Science Department is the academic lead for the course and the LGBT Center is the host and logistical coordinator.  Funds from the Center's Feast on Equality were used to dramatically reduce the cost of the trip.  All undergraduate and graduate students--regardless of gender identity, sexual orientation, or field of study-- are welcome to apply. Dates of travel are May 18-31.

    All the details on cost, etc. including an application packet that students can download are available here.

    Society for American Archaeology (SAA): Historically Underrepresented Groups Scholarship (HUGS)

    The SAA Historically Underrepresented Groups Scholarship (HUGS) helps increase the number of under-represented minorities obtaining degrees in archaeology. It provides funding to minority archaeology students, helping them enhance their education and successfully prepare for a variety of careers in archaeology and heritage management. The scholarship is overseen by the Minority Scholarships Committee of the SAA.

    How to Apply for a Historically Underrepresented Groups Scholarship (HUGS)

    DUE DATE: The HUGS and HUGS-IFR scholarship applications are due by Friday, January 29, 2016, 11:59pm EST. Email the application to hugs@saa.org.

    Few college financial aid packages cover summer coursework, such as lab or field training, making such study an out-of-pocket expense for many students. The SAA is committed to assisting individuals in realizing their goals of entering careers in archaeology by offering two categories of scholarships: the HUGS and the HUGS-IFR.

    HUGS: This scholarship can be used for a field school, to volunteer on a project directed by a professional archaeologist, or to receive other forms of archaeological training. This particular scholarship, however, cannot be used for a field school run by the Institute of Field Research (IFR). For that, see the HUGS-IFR listed below. There will be up to two scholarships for undergraduate students and up to two scholarships for graduate students. Each scholarship is $3,000.

    HUGS-IFR: This scholarship is provided by the Institute of Field Research (IFR) and is to be used for an IFR archaeological field school in Summer 2016.

    IFR will cover the program tuition (up to $5,000) for a student who attends an IFR field school. If the field school costs less than $5,000, students cannot receive the cost difference as cash payment. Applicants must clearly state which IFR field school they wish to attend using this scholarship, and they must show that they have been accepted into that field school.

    The SAA HUGS program recognizes that there are additional costs associated with attending a field school (airfare, basic field supplies, etc.), and will thus provide up to $2,000 for expenses related to attending the IFR field school.

    The recipients of both the HUGS and HUGS-IFR will be selected by the Minority Scholarship Committee of the SAA.

     

    Eligibility

    • You must be a member of historically underrepresented minorities in archaeology, including but not restricted to African American, Hispanic/Latino, Asian American, and other non-European minorities.
    • You must be a citizen or legal resident of either the U.S. or Canada.
    • At the time of application, you must be enrolled in a regionally accredited university in the United States or Canada, or if outside the United States, a university with equivalent accreditation.
    • If the applicant is a graduate student, s/he must be in Year 1 or Year 2 of graduate studies. The applicant cannot already have an M.A./M.S. degree at the time of application.
    • Note: Alaskan Natives, American Indians, Native Hawaiians, and other Pacific Islanders are encouraged to apply to the Native American Scholarships program for parallel funding opportunities.

     

    For questions about the application process, please contact the Minority Scholarships Committee Chair, Tiffiny A. Tung, Associate Professor of Anthropology at Vanderbilt University at t.tung@vanderbilt.edu

     

    You can download the application form here; it’s towards the bottom of the page: http://saa.org/AbouttheSociety/Awards/HistoricallyUnderrepresentedGroupsScholarship/tabid/1516/Default.aspx

    Fall ’15 Student Learning Experience in Ancestral Skills – Lithic Technology

    Instructor: Dr. Amanuel BeyinTeaching Assistant: Austin Warren

    About Lithic Technology:

    Lithic technology concerns with the study and interpretation of stone tools (lithics). With the earliest evidence of stone tool making dating back to about 3.3 million years ago, stone artifacts represent the best surviving material record of early human cognition and behavior. As such, knowledge of stone tool technology provides anthropologists critical information about the origin and development of human culture. In recognition of the vital role of stone tools, in Fall 2015, the department of Anthropology offered a course on Lithic Technology for the first time in several years. The course had the following major goals: a) to familiarize students with the common classes of stone tools invented/used by early humans, b) to offer students practical experiences on how to make and analyze stone tools, and c) to enhance students’ critical thinking skills by exposing them to ancestral skills and challenging them to ask big questions about the foundations of our modern technological ingenuity.

    Photos

    Students learn to make arrowheads in an attempt to replicate the most complex and effective hunting gear ever invented by our prehistoric ancestors.

     

    Dr. Beyin teaches graduate student Mallory Cox how to manipulate an arrowhead.


    The lithics class, with their replica prehistoric hunting gear.

     

    Arrowhead made by students, embedded in a model deer from hand launching projectile weapons.

     

    Graduate students Austin Warren, Mallory Cox, Brandon Zinsious, and Melissa Holst in front of the archaeology lab.

     

    Dr. Beyin teaches undergraduate students how to flintknapp.

     

    Dr. Beyin teaches graduate students how to flintknapp.


    The lithics class flintknapping in the archaeology lab.

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Ethnographic Field School in Belize - June 2016

    Ethnographic Field School (http://cfaa.nku.edu/ethnographic-field-school.html)

    Apply for the for June 2016 Ethnographic Field School Here

    The Center for Applied Anthropology (CFAA) at Northern Kentucky University (NKU) organizes an annual ethnographic field school in Belize directed by Douglas Hume (Associate Professor of Anthropology) every June in collaboration with the NKU International Education Center - Office of Education Abroad and Cooperative Center for Study Abroad (CCSA).  The following information is for the June 2016 Ethnographic Field School in Belize:

    If you wish to be notified of deadlines and other information about this program, please join the Ethnographic Field School in Belize Facebook Group.

    Course Description

    This course immerses students in Belizean culture and trains them in contemporary anthropological field methods. Students will gain valuable research skills (e.g., ethnographic interviewing and qualitative data analysis) to apply anthropology in their future careers (e.g., applied anthropology or other social/behavioral discipline), an appreciation for Belizean cultural diversity, and further their personal growth. While in Belize, students will be primarily engaged in guided applied ethnographic fieldwork. Students will learn about the local culture by doing participant-observation and conducting ethnographic interviews in a community-based research project. Students will learn research ethics, unobtrusive observation, participant observation, field note writing and coding, ethnographic and life history interviewing, ethnolinguistic data collection, community mapping, rapid assessment procedures, qualitative data analysis, and other ethnographic methods in addition to basic ethnographic writing. After successful completion of this course, students will have:

    • developed a basic understanding of Belizean culture,
    • formulated an understanding of ethical and validity issues in ethnographic research,
    • practiced skills in research design and ethnographic methods of data collection,
    • applied basic ethnographic research methods in a non-western culture,
    • engaged in a community-based research project, and
    • analyzed ethnographic data resulting in an ethnographic monograph.

    This program will contribute to the education of students by training them in ethnographic methods and by exposing them to a non-western culture. Students are expected to gain skills that may be used in applying anthropology or other socio-behavioral sciences in their future careers, gain an appreciation for cultural diversity, and further their personal growth. Field experiences such as this project can also improve the likelihood that students will be admitted to graduate school.

    This course is being taught as a 300 (upper-undergraduate) and 500 (graduate) level course in anthropology with a maximum of 12 students. Students will earn three credit hours for participation in the ethnographic field school.  This course will not fulfill NKU’s general education requirements, but may be applied to NKU’s anthropology major or minor requirements.  Students should check with their own institution for what, if any, requirements this course fulfills.

    Each spring, students will be encouraged to present our findings in a scholarly panel at the Anthropologists and Sociologists of Kentucky Annual Meeting. NKU students will be encouraged to present their findings at NKU's spring Celebration of Student Research and Creativity. Students who wish to learn additional ethnographic analysis methods or prepare a short ethnography for publication may arrange independent studies with the director, Douglas Hume.

    Community-based Research Project

    The ethnographic field school, as part of the CfAA, is partnering with Belizean institutes and associations in order to contribute to an understanding of household economy and agricultural knowledge of sugar cane farmers in Orange Walk District village communities.  Our community partners will use our results and recommendations to develop and conduct workshops for farmers on agricultural techniques, economics, health, and other community development topics.  Currently, our community partners include the:

    Program Excursions

    In addition to conducting community-based research, we plan to visit the Belize ZooBanquitas House of CultureCuello's DistilleryLamanai Maya Ruins (via boat on the New River), Nohoch Che'en Caves Branch Archaeological Reserve (Cave Tubing), and the Tower Hill (Sugar Cane) Factory. Locations are subject to change and may be cancelled due to weather or other factors beyond our control.

    Costs

    The price above includes round-trip transportation from designated cities, airport transfers, accommodations, daily breakfast and dinner, program excursions, and health insurance. Tuition is waived for NKU students. For CCSA consortium students, check with your campus study abroad office. For non-CCSA consortium students, please contact the CCSA.

    A minimum of $200.00 should be budgeted for beverages, lunches, and snacks beyond the daily breakfasts and dinners included in the program price. Additionally, approximately $100.00 should be budgeted for required course materials. Participants should also budget additional funds for personal expenses such as souvenirs, based upon their individual spending habits.

    All prices are subject to change in the event of unanticipated increases in airfares, monetary exchange rates or other changes in program costs.

    Students are required to bring a laptop computer with them that is WiFi capable.

    More Information

    For more information about the ethnographic field school in Belize see the links below.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Douglas W. Hume, Ph.D.
    Associate Professor of Anthropology
    Anthropology Program Coordinator
    Director, Center for Applied Anthropology

    Northern Kentucky University
    Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Philosophy
    1 Nunn Drive, 228 Landrum Academic Center
    Highland Heights, Kentucky 41099

    [p] 859.572.5702
    [f] 859.572.6086

    [w] http://cfaa.nku.edu
    [w] http://anthroniche.com
    [w] http://anthropology.nku.edu

    2016 Anthropology Colloquium Series Dates and Schedule

    The dates and schedule for the 2016 Anthropology Colloquium Series at the University of Kentucky is now available. Follow this link to view the schedule of exciting presentations.

    Call for Papers for the CSAS 2016 Meetings April 21-23

    Abstract submissions and registration links are now live on the Central States Anthropological Society (CSAS) website for the 2016 Annual Meetings. As always with Central States Anthro, the meeting will be a great opportunity to present research and ideas to colleagues in Central States’ non-competitive, sincerely anthropological venue, and for students to make the rite of passage of presenting their first professional paper to an encouraging audience. Submissions deadline is January 29th, 2016.

    To submit an abstract, register for the meetings, and for additional information, visit the CSAS website: http://csas.americananthro.org/sample-page/annual-meeting/.

    Late Pleistocene Archaeology Field School in Alaska for Undergraduate Students

    The Adelphi University, Department of Anthropology welcomes applications for our 2016 summer field school in Alaska. Research will focus on the newly discovered Holzman site along Shaw Creek where large mammal bones, mammoth ivory fragments, and stone tools dating to the end of the Ice Age were found last summer. Join our research team in the scenic Tanana Valley as we investigate the question, who were the First Alaskans?

    Taught by experienced faculty with student-instructor ratios among the lowest available (3:1), this program emphasizes a wide range of experiential learning opportunities. For more information about the Adelphi in Alaska Archaeological Field School please see the attached flyer, visit website, or email Brian Wygal (bwygal@adelphi.edu) for an application packet.

    http://anthropology.adelphi.edu/explore/field-research-and-study-abroad/

     

    osea Open School of Ethnography and Anthropology Field Study Abroad 2016

     

    Four & Six Week programs
    · Ethnography Field School
    · Maya Language Immersion
    · Teach English Service Learning

    June 22 to July 30, 2016, Yucatán, México
    Ethnography Field School provides experiential hands on training in learning ethnographic methods in contexts of community action research and service learning.

    Ideal for Graduate students preparing for fieldwork and Undergraduates seeking unique educational and international experience to enter med school, continue in a graduate program, or pursue a career in non-profit community work.

    Interested Graduate Student can apply for Internship positions as Research Assistants who supervise and coordinate undergrad research projects while conducting their research in one of the three OSEA research program areas.

    Ethnography Field School 6 weeks 8 credits
    Students design & conduct research project on Sustainable Community Tourism; sexualities & subjectivities in contexts of cultural change; Visual Ethnography; Heritage, Service Learning; Maya Health and Health and Healing.

    Students working on NGO issues are encouraged to create projects related to Indigenous non-profit community tourism and the spatialization of INGOs in relation to tourism economies

    ​Check out Student Research projects from previous years on website & videos of presentations on
    ​OSEA FB​ page

    Teach English Community Service Learning, 8 credits

    Maya Language Immersion, 6 credits

    OSEA courses are accredited through partner institution
    the Facultad de Antropología of the Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán
    contact@osea-cite.org

    Open School of Ethnography and Anthropology
    www.osea-cite.org
    Visit OSEA on Facebook

    Call for Students: 2016 NAPA-OT Field School in Antigua, Guatemala

    The NAPA-OT Field School in Antigua, Guatemala is now recruiting anthropology, occupational therapy public health, and other social science students for its four-week summer session: May 30 - June 24, 2016.

    The field school offers transdisciplinary learning to promote leadership in social justice through collaboration with Guatemala-based NGO and other community partners. Graduate students and upper division undergraduate majors in anthropology, occupational therapy, public health or related disciplines are encouraged to apply via our website www.napaotguatemala.org by December 31, 2015. 

    The field school is a project of the NAPA-OT SIG (National Association for the Practice of Anthropology - Occupational Therapy and Occupational Science Interdisciplinary Special Interest Group) of the American Anthropological Association. Faculty include anthropologists and occupational therapists with credentials and interests in health care access and human rights, child development, and public health.

    The objectives of the program are:

    · To explore efforts to achieve social justice in Guatemala, a country with a history of ethnic and class violence
    · To examine health disparities in Guatemala through applied medical anthropology theory and human rights discourse
    · To understand the determinants of health and basic epidemiology in developing nations
    · To provide a transdisciplinary fieldwork opportunity to students of occupational therapy, anthropology, and related subjects
    · To promote social justice through partnerships in and around Antigua, Guatemala with NGOs, community groups, health care workers, and other social change agents
    · To explore the concept of “occupational justice” as an emerging practice area in occupational therapy and applied anthropology

    Applicants students will have the opportunity to work in one of three project groups:

    • Health system accountability: Citizen Participation and the right to health in rural Guatemala
    • Midwifery:  Cultural Complexities and Health Care Accessibility
    • Pediatric Practice: Play as a Therapeutic Practice for Undernutrition, Feeding, and Development

    Students also will study Spanish a minimum of 9 hours per week, working one-on-one with certified language instructors at their own level and pace.  Visit our website for more information at www.napaotguatemala.org.