Course Offerings

Current courses offered by the University of Louisville Department of Anthropology.

Spring 2015

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ANTH 201

INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY

4307-201-01      MWF    11:00-11:50         DA 108            STOCKS

3497-201-02      TTh       4:00-5:15            DA 306            NOONAN

*6314-201-03     MW       2:00-3:15            ED 107            STOCKS

6857-201-50                DISTANCE ED                               SEGAL

This course introduces cultural anthropology and surveys its fundamental questions, concepts, methods, and data. The overall question it seeks to answer: what does it mean to be human? Answering this question and many related ones involves learning concepts such as culture, cultural relativism, universalism, evolution, race, gender, and class. The course explores   the   ways   cultural   anthropologists   develop   their   research questions and the methods and data they use to answer them. GEN ED SB  CD2

*This  section   is  restricted  to  students  eligible   for  the Honors  Program.

 

ANTH 202

INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY

2890-202-01    MWF      9:00-9:50             LU 232         PURIFOY

3646-202-02    TTh        11:00-12:15         DA108          CRESPO

This course provides an introductory survey of the basic concepts and perspectives of biological anthropology.    Course topics include a comparative examination of the behavior and biology of human and non- human   primates,   the   fossil   record   of   human   evolution,   and   the evolutionary  basis  of  modern human biological  diversity.  Assignments and course materials vary from section to section.  NOTE: ANTH 201 & 202 may be taken in any order. GEN ED S

 

ANTH 204

INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY

3634-204-01    TTh         8:00-9:15            DA108          DIBLASI

6979-204-02    MWF      1:00-1:50             LU232          HOEFER

5332-204-50                   DISTANCE ED                        DIBLASI

The nature of archaeology as a scientific discipline is examined within a unified theoretical and methodological overview which permits students to learn how archaeologists develop operational means for understanding past cultures.  Complements history major; Hist. Studies course for A&S, Nursing,   Speed;  Soc./Beh.  Sci.  course for Business. (Assignments and course  materials will  vary from  section  to section.)  GEN ED SB CD1

 

ANTH 205/MUH 205

MUSIC IN WORLD CULTURES

4027-205-75       MW        5:30-6:45          MB263        MULHALL

This course explores musical styles from various non-Western cultures in their own social, cultural, and historical contexts. GEN ED SB CD1 Cross- listed with MUH 205

 

ANTH 303

HUMAN ORIGINS

3449-303-01       TTh      2:30-3:45           LU232          CRESPO

This course examines the origins and biological evolution of the human species as seen through the fossil record of human and non-human primates and a comparative review of the behavior and biology of non-uman primates. Prerequisite ANTH 202 or consent  of instructor.

 

ANTH 308

PRIMATES

6310-308-01       MWF     11:00-11:50       LU232        PURIFOY

Survey of primate behavior, ecology, and culture.  Focus on violence and aggression, kin selection, altruism, evolution and sex, the developmental cycle, language, cognition, and male and female social behavior.

 

ANTH 313/MUH 313

STUDIES IN ETHNOMUSICOLOGY

2891-313-01       TTh       2:30-3:45           MB263         MULHALL

This course offers an introduction to different styles and genres of nonwestern  music  and  to  the  cultural  contexts  in  which  these  are practiced. Among the topics to be covered are Japanese puppet theatre, Indian  Kathakali  dance-drama,  Indonesian  gamelan  music,  Chinese opera, Native American stomp dances, African drum languages, Middle East santour performance, Scottish bagpiping, a Peruvian mestizo fiesta.

Prior experience in music is not necessary to enroll in the course. Cross- listed  with MUH 313.

 

ANTH 317/AST 317

ANTHROPOLOGY OF CHINA

8203-317-01      MW      4:00-5:15           HM103         ZHAO

Introduction  to  diverse  aspects  of  contemporary  Chinese  culture  and society. Topics include family, gender, religion, sports, education, politics, and economics among others. Cross-listed with AST 317.

 

ANTH 321

AMERICAN INDIAN WOMEN

3498-321-01            TTh     11:00-12:15            LU232       WICHE

This course analyzes the issues affecting contemporary American Indian women living and working on reservations and in rural and urban communities throughout North America. In reading about the lives, achievements, and contributions of American Indian women, often in their own words, we will see how they traveled the road to where they find themselves today and how their origins and traditions helped to shape their lives.  This course will look at the roles of American Indian women within their societies, in education, in tribal politics, and health issues, and the stereotypes that persist in non-Indian societies.

 

ANTH 322

ARCHAEOLOGY OF NORTH AMERICA

8201-322-01             MW      2:00-3:15                LU232      HAWS

North    America    was    home    to    many    dynamic prehistoric    and historic cultural traditions expressed in a diversity of social, religious, and economic life ways. We will use archaeological and ethnohistoric data in a  cross-cultural  comparative  examination  of  Native  North  American cultures from the initial peopling to European contact. More generally, we will explore the ways in which the Native North American past has served as a laboratory for the development of anthropological theories of human behavior.

 

ANTH 325

ANTHROPOLOGY OF LATIN AMERICA

4670-325-01            TTh      1:00-2:15            LU232          MARKOWITZ

This course is meant as an introduction to the vast and complex social terrain that makes up contemporary Latin America. It surveys general trends  and  features  of  the  region,  emphasizing  their  historical development,  and,  through  case  studies  examines  the  ways  these broader tendencies have affected and are affected by different cultural groups. Such issues as class, community life, religion, gender, racism, migration, and human rights will be addressed.

 

ANTH 336

WAR AND SOCIETY

8209-336-01            TTh      9:30-10:45          LU232        BURNET

This course provides cross-cultural and historical perspectives on war and its larger social context. The theme of the course will be gender and war. We will explore the intersections of masculinity, femininity, violent conflict, and peacebuilding. Course readings and lectures use political, economic, cultural, and feminist approaches to understanding war and its effects on social life. Prerequisites: ANTH 201, SOC 201, or SOC 202. WR

 

ANTH 337

NATIONAL VIOLENCE AND STATE

6315-337-01           TTh     11:00-12:15           HM103        JONES

Cross-cultural examination of nationalism, inter-ethnic and racially- motivated  violence,  genocide,  massacres,  pograms,  warfare,  and  the state, in historical and contemporary contexts.

 

ANTH 338

ANTHROPOLOGY OF REFUGEES

8207-338-01          TTh      1:00-2:15               HM112           PETEET

Theoretical and applied aspects of refugee communities; the relationship between refugees, conflict, and underdevelopment; the experience and meaning of refugee status.

 

ANTH 347

GLOBAL CAPITALISMS

8422-347-01        MW      2:00-3:15                 HM101            ZHAO

The   course   adopts   an   interdisciplinary   approach   to   explore   how capitalism is organized, practiced or resisted. It seeks to understand capitalism as historically situated and culturally- informed practices in different world regions.

 

ANTH 361

ENVIRONMENTAL ANTHROPOLOGY

8192-361-01        MWF     9:00-9:50               DA303          STOCKS

This course is an introduction to the world of environmental anthropology, which is a subfield of cultural anthropology that deals with human- environment relationships. We begin with an introduction to the history and theoretical foundations of environmental anthropology. Ethnographic case studies and other literature are then used to examine theoretical and practical issues related to environmental, social, and economic sustainability.

 

ANTH 400

ANTHROPOLOGY CAREER LAUNCHER

8875-400-01       W        4:00-4:50             DA 208B           STOCKS

This course is a practicum intended to help anthropology majors articulate the  knowledge  and  skills  they  have  acquired  in  their  undergraduate degree  programs  to  potential  employers.  Some  of  the  topics  to  be covered include: (1) looking for a job, (2) writing a resume, (3) writing a cover  letter,  and  (4)  developing  a  professional  online  presence.  The course will also familiarize students with campus resources to assist them in their job search and careers. Prerequisite: Junior  or Senior Status and 15 hrs in Anthropology.

 

ANTH 410

SKELETAL FORENSICS

3499-410-01       TTh      9:30-10:45          DA208B         DIBLASI

This course provides additional details in understanding the human skeleton to estimate the age, sex, race and stature to aid in identifying deceased individuals from skeletal remains.  Additional emphasis is made on determining cause of death based upon various forms of trauma as evidence on the human skeleton.  Prerequisite: ANTH 327.

 

ANTH 508

HISTORY OF ANTHROPOLOGY-WR_CUE

3721-508-01       TTh      4:00-5:15            LU232         PARKHURST

This course is about a labyrinth: the “history” that constitutes anthropological  research  and  theorizing.  We  are  all  already  in  the labyrinth. We are all, that is, history. The task is to chart it out, get a feel for it, and find our ways through and out of it. It is hard to distinguish “it” from “ourselves.” Using a conceptual judo move, the course argues that this apparent weakness is actually strength. The argument is based on various writings in the social sciences from the last 250 years. The course is reading-and writing-intensive. Prerequisite: Senior Status and 18 hrs in Anthropology

 

ANTH 510

METHODS IN BIOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY-WR

5070-510-75       M         5:30-8:15            LU232     TILLQUIST

Biological anthropologists study human variation. This course is an introduction  to  the  methods  and  techniques  of  measuring  human population variation. In this course, you will learn basic anthropometrics and select molecular techniques. Collecting data is the first step in understanding distributions of human variation, analyzing the data is the second step. You will learn to organize data in a spreadsheet, calculate summary statistics and perform some simple statistical analyses. The fundamental  goals  of  the  course  are  to  begin  to  understand  what biological data are and how anthropologists use data to better inform us of characteristics of the human species. Prerequisite: ANTH 202

 

ANTH 530

HUMAN IMPACT ON ENVIRONMENT

8206-530-01      MW        4:00-5:15             LU232         HAWS

This course is about the archaeological and paleoecological record of past human impacts on the Earth.  We will explore a number of concepts regarding socionatural systems including land degradation, perception, resilience, and sustainability.  The course will provide a background for understanding the ways archaeologists and paleoecologists reconstruct past environments and recognize human impacts.  We will examine a number  of  global  case  studies  and  discuss  the  possible  lessons  for current and future decision-making in human land.

 

ANTH 535

NUTRITIONAL ANTHROPOLOGY

8212-535-75      T           5:30-8:15               LU232       TILLQUIST

This  course  provides  students  with  a  broad  overview  of  topics  in nutritional anthropology: an area of study that is highly multidisciplinary. Students will learn to critically think about the impact of culture on the current understanding of nutrition in a bio-cultural context. The course will range over nutritional aspects of human evolution, federal perspectives on nutrition, aspects of nutritional epidemiology, food and ethnicity, food and self, and obesity as culture bound syndrome.

 

ANTH 562

ANTHROPOLOGY OF REFUGEES

8193-562-75      W         5:30-8:15              LU232         PETEET

A close examination of the relationship between forced migration and displacement and contemporary conflict, nationalisms, the state, and territory and belonging, among others. Readings on selected displaced communities are geared towards understanding their experiences. This class will explore critical theoretical issues of concern such as neo- liberalism, expulsions, memory, narratives, demographic and cultural mapping,  and  the  concept  of  culture  itself. Humanitarian  aid  is  a prominent component of the class. SB

 

ANTH 608

SOCIAL AND CULTURAL THEORY

8211-608-75       Th           5:30-8:15          LU232     PARKHURST

Examination of how social and cultural theorists construct accounts of human existence that complement and diverge from one another. Emphasis placed on the relationship between the "classical" theorists of the 19th/early 20th century and current theoretical concerns, and on the relationship between theorizing and empirical description.  Prerequisite: Graduate status.

 

ANTH 610

RESEARCH DESIGN: BIOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY

6980-610-75               M          5:30-8:15        LU232        TILLQUIST

Review of methods, models, and theory from seminal papers and new research in anthropological genetics. Prerequisite: Graduate status  and consent of instructor.

 

ANTH 672

THESIS

4778-672-01            TBA                             TBA                 TILLQUIST

Reading, research, and writing of thesis under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite: Graduate status.

 

INDIVIDUAL INSTRUCTION:

ANTH 401                  CO-OP INTERNSHIP: ANTHRO

ANTH 450                  READINGS AND RESEARCH

ANTH 451                  INDEPENDENT STUDY

ANTH 499                  SENIOR HONOR THESIS